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Poll Result: Poll Takers Spend Time Reading java.net Content

Posted by editor on September 4, 2009 at 11:19 AM PDT

The results of this past week's poll indicate that people who regularly visit the java.net home page spend most of their time on java.net reading content (blogs and articles). The actual poll question and results were:

Which aspect of java.net occupies the most of your time?

  • 18% (31 votes) - Projects
  • 2% (4 votes) - Communities
  • 5% (9 votes) - Forums
  • 69% (117 votes) - Content (blogs and articles)
  • 5% (9 votes) - Other

This outcome actually surprised me quite a bit. I expected projects to attract the most votes. But, it could be that many people who spend most of their time working on projects don't visit the java.net home page often, and instead go directly to the project pages. If that's the case, then those people probably wouldn't normally participate in our polls.

There is good news for the people who spend most of their time on java.net reading blogs and articles. Things are finally starting to settle down with respect to our new underlying CMS infrastructure. java.net bloggers are becoming more comfortable with the new platform, and people are resuming their normal blogging activities. So, you won't be seeing as many blog posts by me pointing you to interesting blogs I follow elsewhere. Instead, our own java.net community will be filling the "Weblogs" section on the front page, as is normally the case.

The other good news is that, after about a month of hiatus, I'll be getting back to publishing articles again. We've got quite a large queue of articles and interviews just waiting for me to give them some time. Now that is going to happen. You'll see the first new article by early next week.

New poll: what's your reaction to the JDK 7 feature list?

The new poll lets you describe your reaction to the JDK 7 feature list. I wrote about the final feature list this past Tuesday. See Joe Darcy's Project Coin: The Final Five (Or So) for additional details. And register your reaction by voting in the poll. Voting will be open until a new poll is posted next Friday.

Just a note: the new poll was submitted by Casper Bang. So, I'd like to publicly thank him for coming up with an excellent and timely follow-on to our earlier poll on JDK 7. At the time of that poll, the specific features that will be included in JDK 7 had not been finalized. Now that the list is out, it's a perfect time get people's reassessed view of the JDK.

If you have an idea for a java.net poll, please submit it using the java.net Submit Content form. Select "Poll Question" on the "Please choose where you think this item should go on the homepage" pull-down.


In Java Today, Joseph Darcy posted "Java Posse #277 Feedback: Not a view from an ivory tower":

The entry below is a slightly edited copy of a message I used to start a new thread on the Java Posse's Google Group, largely in response to comments make by Dick Wall in the first twenty minutes of episode #277 of the Java Posse podcast.

Terrence Barr invites developers to "Join me at OSiM World and WIPJAM, Sept. 15/16, Amsterdam":

WIPJAM has become a fixture on the conference circuit ... if you've never been to one of these then this is your chance to experience it. What is WIPJAM@OSiM, you ask? Find out all about it here - and be sure to register! I'm looking forward to it and I hope to see you there! ...

And John Smart announces "BDD, Easyb and JDave at the Canberra JUG meeting next week": "

I am absolutely thrilled to anounce that I will be talking at the Canberra JUG meeting next week (on Wednesday, September 9, to be exact), about BDD in general, and Easyb and JDave in particular...


In today's Weblogs, Masoud Kalili talks about JPA and a First tier application performance problems:

Well, this is the second time I am using the new blogging platform of Java.net. This time it was much easier and with less hurdle. I want to write about JPA, performance, caching and related things. Though it wont be very well organized but it may come useful for new JPA developers. recently I have assigned a task to work on performance problems of a first tier application and further extend it...

Ramesh Parthasarathy provides SailFin Tips : Advanced Configuration:

Lots of fixes have gone into SailFin 2.0, some of these fixes are related to functionality whereas others are to improve performance. The changes sometimes required creation of new user configurable properties in order to extract the optimal-performance/desired-behavior depending on the users deployment. This article tries to explain some of the properties/attributes that were introduced...

And Jim Driscoll talks about writing a Busy status indicator with JSF 2:

I've had a few requests on how to write a busy status indicator - you know, the little spinning ball that's there while an Ajax call is active, and which goes away once the request is complete. So, I spent about two hours today, and did just that - including putting it into a component so it's reusable. As usual, it involved no Java, and only a minimal amount of JavaScript. First, I needed...


In the Forums, jchamberlain responds Re: Problems configuring a server-side CertStore: "kumar, Thanks for all the help. I figured out what was wrong on my end. I have no need to provide my own CertSelector, I just thought that I had to when I read the documentation. The project that I am using this for uses this endpoint as an..."

superpacko has an issue involving DnD using AWT: "HI, im trying a simple DnD program. Just a JLabel inside a JPanel that im trying to move around. Im able to move it, but once i make the first move when i try to move it again an error comes out, DnD in Progress... the weird thing is that the JLabel..."

And kaplanj responds Re: Is KMZ importor working: "No the java version shouldn't make a different, but I was just looking back at your post, and I see that you are using the dev5 version of Wonderland. There have been a ton of fixes to KMZ importing since then, so if you try a nightly build it should..."


In the current Spotlight, the java.net Java Communications Community announces that SIP Communicator now supports file transfers: "The SIP Communicator project is proud to announce that it now supports file transfer for most protocols supported by SIP Communicator. Starting from build 2002 SIP Communicator users would be able to share files via the XMPP, MSN, Yahoo! Messenger, ICQ and AIM protocols. You can download the application at http://download.sip-communicator.org This implementation is part of an effort funded by the NLnet foundation. However, early research on the subject started long ago and many have contributed."


The current java.net Poll asks "What's your reaction to the JDK 7 feature list?" Voting will be open through early next Friday.


Our Feature Articles include Jeff Friesen's article Introducing Custom Paints to JavaFX, which shows how you can leverage undocumented JavaFX capabilities to support custom paints in JavaFX Version 1.2. We're also featuring Biswajit Sarkar's Using the Payment API for Microcredit and Other Applications, which describes how to apply the Payment API (JSR 229) in JavaME applications.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobility Podcast 86: Mobile Service Architecture 2: Introducing New Features in Mobile Devices: "Kay Glahn from Vodafone Group R&D and Erkki Rysa from Nokia share the new features in MSA2 in this abbreviated feature from JavaOne."


Current and upcoming Java Events:

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