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As I Said, Computers Are Disappearing -- Or, They're Getting Much Smaller, Anyway

Posted by editor on March 31, 2010 at 8:45 AM PDT

Terrence Barr provides an embedded Java update in his most recent blog post, leading off with the soon-to-be-released GuruPlug. The GuruPlug offers a 1.2 GHz ARM processor with 512 MB DRAM, 512 MB Flash memory/drive, Ethernet, WiFi, 2 USB ports, Bluetooth, GPIO, and Linux 2.6. It's a little box (about 5 x 2.5 x 8 cm) that draws under 5 Watts of power (just for reference, I'm writing this on a desktop system that has a 500 Watt power supply). The base GuruPlug model costs $99. I want one!

In his post, Terrence notes:

The GuruPlug is but one in an amazing range of interesting devices: Be it the BUG, the ACME Systems FOX G20 board, the PC Engines ALIX 3D2 (a very compact and cheap PC-class SBC), the Nokia N900, the Marvell plug computer (as exemplified by the GuruPlug/SheevaPlug above), the Sun SPOT, and many more.

The increase in hardware capability is also enabling the introduction of more user-friendly and capable software technologies onto these devices:

a simple executable, a C compiler, and some cobbled-together libraries just don't cut it anymore to build feature-rich embedded solutions on time. Embedded Java is a perfect match...

Terrence discusses how you can get Java onto your mini device. It's easy if it's an X86-based platform, a bit more complicated if you've got an ARM (Advanced RISC Machine) device -- still doable, though. As Terrence says:

And once you have Java running on your target device you then have all the joys of development with Java: Advanced tools (NetBeans and many others), developing and testing on the host (no more complicated cross-compilation), and easy of deployment to the target (just run the class files on the target via memory card, Bluetooh, ftp/ssh, NFS, SMB, or other methods that works best for your situation).

Nice!


In Java Today, the Continuous Blog announces Hudson 1.353 Released:

This week's release comes slightly later than usual and is mostly a clean-up of a few bugs. Due to a problem with the Kohsuke's GitHub mirror of Hudson's core, I can't mine the commits for interesting information as per usual so you'll just have to trust that Hudson 1.353 is chock full of good, wholesome bug fixes...

Terrence Barr reports on The GuruPlug and more: An Embedded Java Update:

Embedded systems are becoming ever more powerful and affordable. Check out the GuruPlug, which is scheduled for release in a couple of weeks and has amazing specs: * Linux 2.6; * 1.2 GHz ARM processor with 512 MB DRAM; * 512 MB Flash, Ethernet, WiFi, 2 x USB, Bluetooth, GPIO; * Low power consumption and small footprint; * Java and OSGi available from distributor; * Retail price: US $99 (standard version)...

Mitchell Pronschinske reports in a JavaLobby Daily Dose - Novell Keeps Unix Copyrights; Linux is Safe:

A US federal judge ruled on Tuesday that Novell owns the Unix copyrights, and not SCO. In the 7-year court battle, SCO claimed that copyrights transferred from their predecessor, the Santa Cruz Operation, to them. In the court ruling, the judge said that the copyrights never transferred to the Santa Cruz Operation in the first place. Tuesday's ruling was a key victory for IBM, who would have faced a multibillion dollar lawsuit had SCO won, and for Linux users, who could have been subject to fees if SCO had gotten the copyrights...


In the Weblogs, Sahoo talks about his EJB as OSGi Service demo at eclipsecon:

I will wrap up my experience at eclipsecon. This was my first time at eclipsecon. Folks who had been here earlier told me that this year there was a lot of topics around eclipse runtime projects – so the focus has shifted from tools to runtime. Overall I liked eclipsecon. My topic, OSGi & Java EE in GlassFish, was also of the same type. The slides of my talk are available here. The source code for the sample used to demonstrate “Modularized Enterprise Java Application” running in GlassFish is now available here. Just download, unzip and run it following the steps listed below...

Juliano Viana reviews Nested forms - what a WickeT idea!:

Have you ever got into the situation where you feel like you need to stretch the limits of HTTP form processing? Sometimes when developing complex web applications you end up with a form that has just too many features on it. This situation is particularly common when the application uses Ajax forms, as these forms often end up accumulating an enormous amount of funcionality - different actions for different buttons, events related to list choices or check box changes, partial screen updates etc. One of the applications I'm currently working on has a requirement that the user should be able to upload files as part of bigger system interactions...

Rama Pulavarthi has posted a Rant on Ant 1.7.1:

If you are using Ant 1.7.1 for developing Web Services with JAX-WS/JAXB, I suggest you to move to the latest version Ant 1.8.0. JAXB/JAX-WS rely on package level runtime annotations for lot of things. For ex: JAXB relies on the @XmlSchema annotation in package-info.java and uses it for binding Java data types to XML schema types. You might be puzzled to see that the mappings are not as expected. I wasted almost half a day trying to figure out if there was some regression in JAX-WS/JAXB as I was suspecting Ant the least. A bug in Ant 1.7.1 javac ant task, makes it not compile package-info.java. This is a serious regression...


In the Forums, shhmikey is confronting a Glassfish V3 multiple virtual servers problem: I have thirteen different IP's all listening on port :80 under Glassfish V2 - but after spending 2 days on GF V3 - I can't get multiple IP's listening on port 80 to work. Fresh Solaris Sparc install. Fresh Glassfish V3 install...

In the GlassFish WebTier forum, digitalseraphim has noted Strange behavior/Possible bug: I'm writing a simple JSF 2.0 app using Glassfish V3. I will be outputting types other than just (x)html, so I wanted to change javax.faces.DEFAULT_SUFFIX to ".jspx" instead of the default of ".xhtml" just because the contents are not always xhtml. When...

In the Metro and JAXB forum, durfff is working on Listing Available Methods & Parameters from a WSDL: Hi, I'm trying to find a way to access a WSDL and generate a list of available methods and their respective parameters. Typically I've done this via the generated service classes and reflection, but now need to do this by accessing the WSDL...


Our Spotlight this week is Window / dock icon for ribbon frame in Flamingo 5.0:

The application menu button in the ribbon component from Flamingo component suite is a big round button in the top left corner of the ribbon. It is not a direct replacement for the usual application menu bar, but rather a place to hold actions that (as a general rule) do not affect the visual content of the document – such as saving, printing, sharing etc. Prior to version 5.0, the ribbon frame...


This week's java.net Poll asks What do you like most about the new GlassFish Roadmap?. The poll will run until Friday.


Our latest Feature Article is Flexible Swing Reporting Using JIDE Aggregate and Pivot Tables, by Malcolm Davis; in this article, you learn about a Swing report alternative that provides 90% of the solution with 10% of the effort. We're also still featuring Getting Started with Java and SQLite on Blackberry OS 5.0 by Java Champion Bruce Hopkins -- learn how to create applications that utilize SQLite on Blackberry OS 5.0; and Dibyendu Roy's Rethinking Multi-Threaded Design Principles.


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-- Kevin Farnham

O'Reilly Media
Twitter: @kevin_farnham