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Poll Result: Developers Express Varying Views on Improving Java DB

Posted by editor on July 1, 2012 at 7:46 PM PDT

Our most recently completed Java.net poll did not reveal a clear consensus among developers regarding a specific Java DB improvement or new feature they consider to be most important. A total of 212 votes were cast in the poll, and three comments were posted. The exact question and results were:

  • 20% (42 votes) - More performance monitors
  • 3% (6 votes) - User-defined aggregates
  • 10% (22 votes) - Full outer join
  • 7% (14 votes) - Enable/disable triggers and constraints
  • 8% (17 votes) - Spatial datatypes
  • 3% (7 votes) - Expression indexes
  • 6% (13 votes) - Better concurrency for identity columns
  • 8% (18 votes) - Other
  • 34% (73 votes) - I don't know

We don't have too many polls where "I don't know" is the top choice. Among those who knew what new feature or improvement they'd like to see in Java DB, a plurality favored more performance monitors, with the remaining choices receiving a scattering of votes.

The three comments suggested three additional desired improvements or new features: synchronization with 'master' database; DERBY-5356 - better space reclamation; and full text search.

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