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JavaOne Polls: 2012 Announcement Anticipation, and Attendance

Posted by editor on September 26, 2012 at 9:08 PM PDT

With JavaOne just around the corner, our latest Java.net polls have asked the community questions about the conference. Our most recently completed poll focused on significant announcements that people expect to happen at JavaOne 2012; while our current poll asks if you've attended JavaOne(s).

The significant announcements poll was quite popular, drawing 694 votes, along with a comment. The exact question and results were:

The most significant announcement at JavaOne 2012 will be related to:

  • 27% (190 votes) - JavaEE
  • 28% (193 votes) - JavaSE / OpenJDK
  • 6% (42 votes) - JavaME / Embedded Java
  • 11% (74 votes) - JavaFX
  • 12% (84 votes) - I don't know
  • 16% (111 votes) - Other

So, clearly, this (non-scientific) poll produced no overwhelming consensus. But, the developers who voted believe the most significant announcement will be related to either Java SE / OpenJDK or Java EE. More than half of the votes expect one of these results.

I myself would have had a hard time voting in this poll (being the poll creator, I never vote). Last year, I think the most significant announcement was in essence the cumulative indications that Oracle had a clear-cut plan for Java's future. Since then, we've had some disappointments, the biggest recent one being that Project Jigsaw will be on the next train.

The fact that we have a new mini-conference taking place at this year's JavaOne, Java Embedded @ JavaOne, suggests to me that there may well be some quite significant announcements related to JavaME / Embedded Java at the conference. Surely, they'll want to draw attention to a new mini-conference with some sort of important announcement!

JavaFX drew a considerable number of votes too. Comparing where we were a year ago to where we are today, with respect to JavaFX, it feels to me like JavaFX is definitely going to continue to "move forward" as a client application technology within the Java sphere. It's a bit like when Microsoft pushes something within the .NET framework. If the primary sponsor of the Java language is committing significant resources to JavaFX as the Java client platform of the future, who in their right mind among the developer community is going to think JavaFX is a doomed technology, and not pay at least some attention to it?

New poll: have you been to a JavaOne?

Our current Java.net poll asks Have you ever attended a JavaOne Conference? The poll will be open through Friday, October 5 (or maybe Saturday October 6, if I don't have a way to create a new poll on that Friday as I'm returning home from JavaOne).

Looking ahead...

Ah, JavaOne. I look forward to it! If you'll be there and you'd like to chat with me, I will often be in the Java.net area in the JavaOne Exhibition Hall. I'll be posting my whereabouts throughout the conference via my @kevin_farnham Twitter account, and probably other ways as well.

We'll be having a special JavaOne oriented home page on Java.net as well, including blogs, a conference-related Twitter feed, etc. I'll be writing many blogs about my conversations with people, and about the sessions I attend!


Java.net Weblogs

Since my last blog post, there have been several new interesting java.net blogs:


Poll

Our current Java.net poll asks Have you ever attended a JavaOne Conference? Voting will be open until Friday, October 5.


Spotlights

Our latest Java.net Spotlight is Alex Staveley's Is Java Dead or Invincible?:

According to Dutch research firm Tiobe in terms of overall popularity, Java ranked 5th in 1997, 1st in 2007 and 2nd in Sept 2012. At the time of writing there are over 2,000 Java progamming books on Amazon in English and there are almost 300,000 threads on Stackoverflow related to Java. As George Orwell once said: "Whoever is winning at the moment will always seem to be invincible". But...


Articles

Our latest Java.net article from Manning Publications is Discovering CMIS Type Collections and Hierarchies by F.Müller, J.Brown, & J.Potts, the authors of "CMIS and Apache Chemistry in Action."


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-- Kevin Farnham (@kevin_farnham)