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Poll Result: Java Developers Are Following Java 8 Lambda Expressions Progress

Posted by editor on December 12, 2012 at 11:35 AM PST

Our most recently completed Java.net poll suggests that the Java developer community is paying some attention to the progress of the Lambda Expressions (closures) component of Java 8. Of course, the poll is by no means scientific. A total of 332 votes were cast in the poll. The exact question and results were:

What's your current level of involvement with Java 8 Lambda Expressions (closures)?

  • 35% (115 votes) - I've downloaded Java 8 pre-releases and experimented with Lambda Expressions
  • 22% (73 votes) - I've been following the news about Lambda Expressions in Java 8
  • 20% (67 votes) - I know they'll be in Java 8; I'll investigate when that comes out
  • 5% (17 votes) - I'm not interested in Lambda Expressions in Java
  • 10% (34 votes) - I don't know
  • 8% (26 votes) - Other

I would not have expected a plurality of votes to go to the "I've downloaded Java 8 pre-releases..." option. Yet, more than 1/3 of the voters in this poll chose that option. Another 22% said they've been following the news about Java 8 Lambda Expressions. Totalling these results in 57% of the voters indicating that they're following Lamba Expressions development, with a majority of these having already experimented with Lambda Expressions.

A further 20% of the voters plan to investigate Lambda Expressions when Java 8 is released. So, among the developers who chose to vote in this poll, more 3/4 will have looked into Java 8 Lambda Expressions fairly soon after Java 8 is released.

Only 5% of the voters expressed being uninterested in Lambda Expressions in Java. Somewhat surprisingly (to me, anyway), 10% of voters either didn't know what their current level of involvement with Java 8 Lambda Expressions was; while 8% explicitly stated that none of the available options described their level of involvement.

Thinking a bit more about this poll: the total number of votes was lower than has been the case in some other recent polls. Perhaps this is partly because holiday season is happening or approaching for many cultures? But, another possible reason, it seems to me, is that the poll question may have naturally attracted developers who are interested in Java Lambda Expressions, while developers for whom Lambda Expressions are not that relevant chose not to vote.

I always put that "not a scientific poll" statement into my blogs about polls; because they aren't scientific. At the same time, I find them interesting!

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Comments

When dynamic evaluations of expressions are needed and ...

When dynamic evaluations of expressions are needed and defined at runtime, the lambda will be an elagant way to solve this issue.