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Flipping the switch

Posted by daniel on September 16, 2003 at 9:38 AM PDT

As of today, there is a single front page for java.net. There have been many changes to the site since we launched three months ago at JavaOne but this is the most visible.

You'll find the items that change daily in the center column. That includes this daily summary from me (that is still available as an RSS feed). We've added a spot for daily stories from java.net projects and communities and a link to the new and much improved Community Homepage. The day's featured Weblogs have been moved to the center column and, as always, you can find the rest on the Weblogs Homepage. Each day we link to a couple of Java articles. For the last month we've been collecting them in the Also Today Archive. At some point we'll go back and add all of the Also Today's since the site launched. Finally, we list the day's Java News Headlines with useful links to what's being discussed in the stories. Visit the News Archive and while you're there submit a story that you think we should include.

The right column contains the items that change less frequently. Many of these are updated weekly. You'll find this week's featured articles together with a link to our past featured articles. Next comes our project spotlight. Each week we will spotlight a java.net project. Feel free to email me to recommend projects you would like to see recognized. The java.net Events page includes upcoming events of interest to the Java community. Registered users can submit their upcoming events. Finally, if there is an item you remember seeing on java.net, take a look through the java.net archives. This is just a daily snapshot of the front page.

That leaves the left column. We've cleaned up the site navigation and tried to make it easier for you to find your way to the active areas of java.net. In addition to links to areas of the site, you'll find links to RSS feeds and a snapshot of the weekly stats.

So what do we have for you today? Here's a quick rundown for those that subscribe via RSS.

In Projects and Communities we begin with stories that you may have seen from the Jini and Java Games communities. For Jini we link to Frank Jennings article Accessing MBeans Through the Jini Service where he describes how to combine the two technologies to create a self-healing and intelligent network. We also link to the Java Games community homepage to highlight their daily news feature. The JOGL project (Java bindings for Open GL) is week's featured project. It is accompanied by Chris Adamson's feature article Jumping into JOGL.

In today's featured Weblogs Eve Maler writes SAML v 1.1 is final. She covers some of the benefits (such as single sign-on) of the Security Assertion Markup Language. David Walend writes about SomnifugiJMS for User Interfaces and Simple-Enough APIs. He write about a pattern he calls "Use Topics to communicate from the view".

Using a Topic to communicate from the view to the controller simplifies both by decoupling them. The view generates messages whenever any user action happens. The controller digests those messages. The JMS API is small and easy to learn and use. Using Topics simplifies performance decisions about handling Threads and shared Objects. The projects become more predictable, easier to decouple and test, and more pleasant to work on.

Joshua Marinacci rounds out today's offering with a look at why career programmers will always have a job. He considers the following two opposing forces of software that he thinks contributes the an ongoing need for programmers: (1) software always gets cheaper and (2) the inherent complexity of software. His piece could have been titled "Why the future does need us".

In the Also today section we link to a Java World article on Java Web services for various client types. Avinash Gokli suggests that you consider the various clients for your web service as you design and build it. Per Bothner looks at the changes to the XQuery spec in the XML.com article An XQuery Update. This is a nice summary for those not directly tracking the spec.

From the Java Today News Page, news editor Steve Mallett, has gathered the following News Headlines .

Registered users can submit news items using our submission form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to the java.net News RSS feed.

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