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The look and feel of java.net

Posted by daniel on February 26, 2004 at 8:46 AM PST

Have you ever had an idea in your head that you describe to someone else to implement. Usually when you see what they've done you say "no, that's not it".

Not so with Miky Vacik. Miky is the graphic designer who has helped shape the look and feel of java.net. We would describe what we were thinking for a graphic for an article or for the look of the homepage and Miky would come back with something better than we were thinking. He has talent and taste and is wonderful to work with. Miky will be leaving us today as a full time member of the team. He has helped steer the changes we will soon be making to the java.net homepage. We are hoping he can continue to help us improve the site.

Thank you Miky.


In
Weblogs , there's another open letter. Chris Adamson links to the latest one from IBM to Sun: Make Java Open-Source . Chris provides links to the letter from IBM's VP of Emerging Technology Rod Smith to Sun's VP and Sun Fellow Rob Gingell.

John Reynolds reports on Marc Fleury's presentation to the Austin JUG in JSR 175, JBoss and AOP. John writes "The JBoss platform has always provided services for object persistence, remote access, and transaction support as have all J2EE app servers, it's called supporting the EJB spec. With the introduction of JBoss 4 these services will be decoupled from each other, and they will be made available to developers on a mix and match basis, only use the services (aspects) that you need. For example, if all you want is persistence for a Plain Old Java Object (POJO), JBoss will provide it."

Bill Day announces that between now and March 7 you can take a Free J2ME Certification Exam . Sun is looking for feedback on the exam and, as Bill says, the beta exam is free and if you pass your certification stands.

Andreas Schaefer has been thinking about A Generic Application Server . He's put his thoughts together on his personal blog which he links to from this post. He's thinking that ". In this server everything is deployable like Containers, Services (as of Transaction, Security, Persistence, Pooling etc) and Applications. The application server specification is replaced by a contract each deployment unit exposes with their requirements and features they offer. The server will then match the components together so that a fully deployed application is formed. If a component is missing a deployment unit will remain inactive until everything becomes available. Even a naming service is deployed and therefore one server can hosts multiple naming services at once."


In
Also in Java Today
, Thoughtwork's Jon Tirsen discusses Using Ruby to build Java systems. His team " started out with Ant-scripts generated by XSLT from a configuration-file." Soon "the generated build-script was several megabytes large." Tirsen explains that the decision was made to move to a scripting language and they decided on Ruby although Perl or Python would have been fine. They also needed to run Ant tasks and created "a small "Ant-server", a simple program that once started took Ant-snippets on it's standard input and printed out the results on the standard output."

The strength of the Struts framework, according to Werner Ramaekers, is that "Struts does not pretend to offer you a complete solution for all of your web application needs; that has never been the goal of the project. The developers of the framework have chosen to make Struts very extensible: you, as an application developer, can easily replace any of the classes that are deployed as part of the Struts framework to provide the missing pieces you need for your application's architecture." In Security in Struts: User Delegation Made Possible Ramaekers provides a detailed example of how to extend Struts to provide a more flexible security solution.


In today's Projects and Communities The JUGs community features "Frans Thamura, leader of JUG Indonesia. He lives on Java (the island), speak the Java language (the real one), and runs both a Java User Group and a Java based company."

The Java Patterns homepage links to an online patterns resource currently hosted at Rice University. This is a classroom resource and both recommends and assumes that visitors have the GoF book.


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