Skip to main content

Gosling on the Sun/Microsoft Settlement

Posted by daniel on April 13, 2004 at 2:40 AM PDT

"We're not a bunch of moronic secret subversive Microsoft lapdogs. We've worked very hard over the years to fairly balance the needs of all the various communities. Relax. Have a little faith."

In today's Weblogs , James Gosling responds to some of the recent speculation about the Sun/Microsoft Settlement. Of course, true conspiracy theorists will just see whatever Gosling says as part of the conspiracy.

It is nice to hear Gosling dispel the rumor that Rich Green left Sun in disgust. Gosling counters, "Rich worked very hard to make this agreement happen. He left in relief, happy that things were settled in a way that left him with a clear conscience and a sense of closure. In fact he (and I, and many others) felt that concluding the suit was good for Sun, good for the industry, and good for the Java community."

Keep reading Gosling's post beyond his comments on the Sun/MS deal and you'll find the following analysis of conflicts between developers working on platform software like Linux or the JDK. Gosling writes that the platform interface "divides the world of developers into two groups: those who work under the interface to implement it, and those who work above the interface and build applications based on it. These two communities have needs that conflict. In particular, a blanket freedom for developers under the interface, to do whatever they damn well please, is incredibly disruptive and damaging to developers above the interface. The catch in the Sun Java source license is all about defending the needs of developers who work above the interface. This ends up being constraining to folks who work under the interface, but in a way that is hugely beneficial to those who work above."

Also in Weblogs, John Bobowicz announces updates to the governance guidelines for the java.net community in java.net Governance 2.0 is posted.


In
Also in Java Today
, Sun has published an article about their recently released Java Studio Creator: An IDE to Create Web Applications . The IDE is built on top of NetBeans with JavaServer Faces, JDBC Rowsets, and Java APIs for XML Web Services. The article explains that this information is probably more technical than users of the IDE will need as Creator is "aimed at those of you who are just learning Java technologies, are corporate developers who rely on development tools and don't have heavy coding experience, or have little time for coding from scratch and need to create applications quickly."

In Improve Application Management With JMX you get an overview of how "JMX defines a standard means for applications to expose management functionality, a process called instrumentation, and a standard management middle tier, the JMX agent, which acts as a single point of entry to management components." The article goes on to describe MBeans, or managed beans, which "is simply a concrete Java class that obeys certain rules, making objects of that class manageable by the JMX agent (or other MBean-aware agents) in a uniform way. "


In today's Projects and Communities , the Jini Community is highlighting the Jeans project. The goal of the Jeans Framework project is to bring Jini services to the desktop, eliminating the need to open a console to manage or use a Jini service.

There's been a flurry of activity on the aTrack project. Check out this " open source bug tracking application that [...] uses AOP pragmatically to provide systematic support for technical, middleware, and business concerns."


In today's java.net News Headlines
:

Registered users can submit news items for the href="http://today.java.net/today/news/">java.net News Page using
our news submission
form
. All submissions go through an editorial review by news director
Steve Mallet before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to
thejava.net
News RSS feed
.


Current and upcoming
Java Events
:

Registered users can submit event listings for the href="http://www.java.net/events">java.net Events Page using our href="http://today.java.net/cs/user/create/e"> events submission
form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being
posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as the
Java
Today RSS feed
. All java.net members can subscribe to the email
updates for the site at the href="https://java-net.dev.java.net/servlets/ProjectMailingListList">
java-net Mailing Lists page. You must be logged in to subscribe
to
the javanet_Daily and javanet_Weekly lists. Also, once this page
is no longer featured as the front page of
java.net
it will be archived along with other past issues in the href="http://today.java.net/today/archive/">java.net Archive.