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Multiple source directories

Posted by daniel on April 23, 2004 at 5:09 AM PDT

When might you use multiple source directories for a single project?

That's the question in today's Weblogs . Vincent Brabant asks Why do we need more than one source directory for one project? He provides a look at one of his directory trees and an explanation of how he likes to organize his source files but says "personally, I liked to have more than one source directory in the same project.
I really don't want to create a project, only for some classes.
The problem is that I have no solid arguments to really have more than one source directory in the same project.
That's the reason I need your help.
If you are using more than one source directory in your project, could you post here the reason why.
If you are never using more than one source directory in your project, could you also teach me how to change my way of building a project ?" Post your thoughts on this on his blog.

Malcolm Davis has been reading what he thought to be technical articles are wolves in sheeps' clothing. He writes Where's the marketing occurring? Subliminal messages in technical articles of course. He comments on a particular piece that he recently read on "ASP.NET and Struts: Web Application Architectures". Malcolm writes "As we mature we cultivate a sense of skepticism, we expect problems with articles, plus marketing occurs. However, Microsoft takes the art of self-promotion to an entirely new level with the sub-conscious attacks on Java." A reader responds that this behavior is not limited to Microsoft sponsored articles.


In
Also in Java Today
, part one on security in an excerpt from Avinash Chugh and Jon Mountjoy's "WebLogic: The Definitive Guide". This chapter covers security mechanisms in WebLogic including the Java Security Manager and how WebLogic filters connection requests. The authors also cover WebLogic's authentication and authorization framework and how it supports the standard J2EE security services.

Charlie Calvert presents "the simplest possible example of creating a Generic class in Java 1.5. " In the Borland Developer Network article A Gentle introduction to Generics, Calvert begins by creating his own Generics class to use in the examples. This gives you a peek inside what is happening at the other end when you use Generics in your code.


In today's Projects and Communities , The ACM article Death by UML Fever says that "UML is largely an innocent victim caught in the midst of poor process, no process, or sheer incompetence of its users. [..] UML sometimes does amplify the symptoms of some fevers as the result of the often divine-like aura attached to it."

From the Java Web Services and XML community homepage, "The SE/EE Executive Committee has approved the Final Approval Ballot of JSR-114 JDBC Rowset Implementations."


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