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Serious Diversions

Posted by daniel on September 6, 2004 at 3:05 AM PDT

Fun with Lava Lamps

We'll start with a little fun for a Monday. In his blog entry
Bubble, Bubble, Build's In Trouble
, Mike Clark fleshes out the details of a story he told in his Pragmatic Automation book about "Alberto Savoia. He describes how his project uses red and green lava lamps to radiate the status of their scheduled build. Better yet, those lamps are controlled using X10 devices such as those used to turn on your household lamps so that you don’t arrive home to a dark house."

In
Also in Java Today
, Nuno Santos found himself facing a performance problem while implementing a messaging system required to support 3,000 simultaneous connections. The popular thread pooling approach wouldn't work because of overhead concerns switching between treads. He writes, "as an alternative to thread pooling, we decided to use I/O multiplexing. In this approach, a single thread is used to handle an arbitrary number of sockets. This allows servers to keep their thread count low, even when operating on thousands of sockets, thereby improving scalability and performance significantly." In the article Building Highly Scalable Servers with Java NIO, Nuno shows how a Swing-like event-dispatching model helped create a powerful I/O architecture.


In today's Weblogs Malcolm Davis advises you to sell your truck. He concludes "Planning is a difficult task, and it is human nature for people to rely on every crutch possible. However, some times the crutch needs to be removed for people to learn to walk. One of my top recommendations for this mammoth IT, with thousands of developers, is to eliminate BlackBerry's from the development staff. Eliminating the BlackBerry’s would not only help the development staff by providing flow state, but also force the mangers to become better planners."

David Rupp takes you through the steps of setting the -clean option for Eclipse on the Mac in IBM Web Tools Platform for Eclipse.

John Reynolds evaluates the process of replacing text in Netbeans and Eclipse and says that " NetBeans 4 has added a slew of great features, and I may switch back, but sadly that original pet peave of mine has still gone unaddressed." The complaint is with the replace dialog.


In Projects and Communities, the Federale project "provides a graphical browser with which Jini federations are displayed, created, and modified." It has been updated to display and manage Jini 2.0 compliant services.

Swank is a scriptable toolkit for building GUIs with a Tk-like paradigm. It is the GUI toolkit companion to the scripting language Jacl (Java Command Language) analogous to the pairing of Tk and Tcl.


What will programming be like in 100 years?
In today's Forums,
Jonathan Simon writes "This chapter focuses on what languages will look like and how we will be programming in one hundred years. [..] I believe in 100 years we will have quantum computing, and it will non-trivially change the way we program and how we structure languages. "

John M points out "Note: for people who haven't gotten a copy of the book yet, you can read the original, online versions of the various essays from Paul Graham's web site: http://www.paulgraham.com/articles.html"

Rythos has some thoughts on why Nerds are so unpopular. "Nerds like to discuss Ideas (or at worst, Things). People discuss other People, so how on _earth_ can we have any sort of meaningful conversation?"


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