Skip to main content

Sleep Through The Static

Posted by editor on December 24, 2007 at 6:33 AM PST


Wrapping up for the holidays

With the 2007 holidays here, it's time to put the front page to sleep for a week while most of us are away for the holidays. Don't worry: projects, forums, wikis, source-control, weblogs and the rest of the infrastructure will stay up and running. But with O'Reilly off for a week and Sun gone for two, we're going to post a single updated front page today and keep that around until we return on January 2, 2008.

As the year wraps up, I want to thank our group at O'Reilly for their work supporting the community and the feature articles, notably Sarah Kim, Jennifer Palm-Ensign, Rachel Thurow, Greg Dickerson, and our boss, Nancy Abila. Over at Collabnet, Jim Wright has been the Community Manager for java.net for the last year, with Andrew Kelly now taking over that role. I also want to thank a number of Collab's support people, notably Padma Ramanujam and Mathangi Sathyanarayanan, the latter of whom I can always count on to delete blog-spammer accounts quickly (yes, e-mail me or anyone else on the Infrastructure Team if you get spammed; we try to delete spammer accounts quickly to stem the damage). Over at Sun, Marla Parker helps keep the communities hopping, with help from Gary Thompson and Sonya Barry. Thanks to all, and if I've forgotten someone, e-mail or IM me so I can edit this blog to include them.


While we're away, I thought it might make sense to use the Java Today space to point out a number of useful resources that, while they're all part of the ubiquitous left nav, are sometimes overlooked by many java.net users. If you're looking for colleagues who share your interests, for help with your project, or for a job or an employee, then these are resources you'll want to check out often.

The help wanted section of java.net is both for developers looking for an interesting project to work on and for those involved in a java.net project who are looking for someone to fill a particular need. Listings are restricted to volunteer openings for non-commercial projects. Project listings remain live for 30 days, or until closed by the project owner, whichever comes first.

The java.net Jobs Wiki are where you should go to post or look for available jobs, and where you should go to post or look for resumes. The JobPostings page offers a place for employers to post available positions, while the ResumePostings page is where you can post your resume to have it seen by potential employers. The pages are viewable by anyone, but to post a job or resume, you need to be a java.net member.

Have you created or updated your people page?
The People Wiki is a place where people can tell the community a little about themselves. Whether you are looking for help with your project or just someone with similar interests to spark a Java discussion, the People Wiki is the right place to introduce yourself to the community. Simply start your own page, or use the search function to find whom your looking for.


In today's Weblogs,
Joshua Marinacci celebrates the holidays with a
A JavaFX Christmas Demo.
"I'm spending some of my time learning JavaFX Script and working on new demos. So here is my new Christmas demo, which I hope to make an annual occurrence."

Greg Murray combines Ajax toolkits in
jMaki and GWT : Kissing Cousins.
"Google Web Tookit (GWT) and jMaki both provide great models for developing Ajax applications. They have differing design approaches: jMaki is script centric and GWT is more focused on static bindings. When used together, jMaki give GWT access to many third party libraries, with dozens of new components for the GWT developer. This blog discusses the integration of jMaki charting with GWT."

Finally, Marc Hadley has been
WADLing in Jersey.
"In recent weeks we've switched many parts of Jersey including the WADL subsystem to use a shared abstract resource model that is built at runtime. This has allowed us to add some additional functionality that I'll describe here."


Today's Forums start with a question from
omrifouad
Warming up Java Code?
"Java code execute at very different speeds during an application's lifetime. Initially, it might execute in interpreted mode; if it executes enough times (if it is hot), it becomes a candidate for compilation to native code. Is it possible to know how much times should be a method iterated to become hot? As far as i know, early JVM's do have a method invocation threshold (Client JVM: 1500 and Server JVM:10000). Do the new JVM's have the same threshold?"

wmeissner offers an opinon on an OS choice for Java developers in
Re: Best platform for Java development? MacBook Pro with OS X, or pure Windows?.
"I use a macbook pro, and now that soylatte is there, its not too painful for java6 development. Still a bit clunky, but acceptable. Plus, you can run Windows and linux inside vmware fusion, so you can test your app on all three without too much hassle. However, if you want the least painful java development system, windows is the way to go. All the cool things (e.g. update N) will get released for it first, and thats where the majority of users and developers are."

Finally, stevpan notes that
6uNEA screen flickers when switching between fullscreen/window mode.
"I setup 6uNEA 1 week ago. It's excellent -- the browser freezes/hangs disappear. Some small bugs still exist. My slideshow app flickers when switching between fullscreen and window mode. I tested my app with JRE1.6.0, 1.6.0_01, 1.6.0_02, 1.6.0_03. It could switch smoothly in all these stable releases (no screen flickers). As I could not find bug report, I have to post it here. Hope that 6uNEA will be stable soon."


And for those of you who've been playing the Blog Game -- each week, all the editor's blog titles are also song titles from a single artist -- here's the answer key for 2007. Some you know, some you don't (hey, I get to indulge my favorite little-known artists every now and then). Go check out the archives and see how many you got right.

1/1/07 Electric Light Orchestra
1/8/07 Jeff Beck
1/15/07 The B-52's
1/22/07 Kansas
1/29/07 The Cars
2/5/07 Collective Soul
2/12/07 NRBQ
2/19/07 Joe Tex
2/26/07 Aerosmith
3/5/07 The Tubes
3/12/07 The MC5
3/19/07 The Delgados
3/26/07 U2
4/2/07 Fleetwood Mac
4/9/07 The Bangles
4/16/07 Kraftwerk
4/23/07 Pete Townshend
4/30/07 Depeche Mode
5/14/07 The Arcade Fire
5/21/07 Sarah McLachlan
5/28/07 Disney feature animation soundtracks
6/4/07 Cyndi Lauper
6/11/07 Immaculate Machine
6/18/07 Thomas Dolby
6/25/07 The Police
7/2/07 Paul McCartney
7/9/07 The Zombies
7/16/07 R.E.M.
7/23/07 Smashing Pumpkins
7/30/07 Tegan and Sara
8/6/07 John Mellancamp
8/13/07 Lindsey Buckingham
8/20/07 John Lennon
8/27/07 Public Enemy
9/3/07 Jackson Browne
9/10/07 Paul Simon
9/17/07 Foreigner
9/24/07 Dave Matthews Band
10/1/07 Rilo Kiley
10/8/07 Indigo Girls
10/15/07 George Harrison
10/22/07 Jane's Addiction
10/29/07 Nine Inch Nails
11/5/07 Emma Pollock
11/12/07 The Crystal Method
11/19/07 John Sebastian
11/26/07 Bonnie Raitt
12/3/07 John Mayer
12/10/07 KT Tunstall
12/17/07 Jack Johnson

Current and upcoming Java
Events
:

Registered users can submit event listings for the href="http://www.java.net/events">java.net Events Page using our href="http://today.java.net/cs/user/create/e">events submission form.
All submissions go through an editorial review before being posted to the
site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered weekdays as
the Java
Today RSS feed
. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the
front page of java.net it will be
archived along with other past issues in the href="http://today.java.net/today/archive/">java.net Archive.

Wrapping up for the holidays