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Java vs .Net, the debate that isn't

Posted by larryjava on September 15, 2013 at 12:05 PM PDT

My company uses a large number of software applications to support all aspects of its business.
These software applications are either "bought" or "built".
The portions of the company that cannot be supported by purchased software are
supported by custom developed, in-house, applications.
A variety of technologies are used to create and build these custom applications.

The Java framework has been successfully used to create applications for many years.

The .Net framework has also been successfully used to create applications for many years.
.Net is a software framework developed by Microsoft Corp. that runs primarily on MS Windows.
It includes a programming language called C# (C Sharp) and an IDE called Visual Studio.

Both frameworks enjoy strong support among the technical IT community at my company.

From time to time, the question is asked; "Do we really need both Java and .Net frameworks?"

Each time this question comes up, our initial reaction is; "Oh no! Here we go again, Java vs .Net!"

Somebody will be asked to do a "study" of the various technical strengths and weaknesses of both frameworks.
Somebody will be asked to do a "study" of the various support costs of both frameworks.
Somebody will be asked to do a "study" of the various ways both frameworks are being used to develop apps.
Somebody will be asked to do a "study" of how apps built in one framework can be built using the other framework.

Yawn. Zzzzzzzzzz.

In the end, the result is always the same.

It is decided to keep both Java and .Net frameworks and to continue to develop the apps
that are currently using them.

Just as there is plenty of diversity within the Java framework to produce quality apps.
There is plenty of diversity in other development frameworks (.Net) to produce quality apps as well.

I am sure my company will continue to be successful using the variety of development frameworks it now uses.
There is plenty of room, in my company, for Java and .Net frameworks.

Until the next episode of "Java vs .Net".