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Java and starting over

Posted by larryjava on September 22, 2013 at 4:16 PM PDT

Recently, I was asked to participate in creating another Java application at my company.
It was to be our team's third major Java application since 2002.
We felt we had plenty of wisdom from our previous two Java applications to apply to our third one.

One of our first steps was to form an application architecture sub-team.
This sub-team's purpose was to provide the development team with a solid foundation.
We began our work by examining various technical & architecture-level issues related to the new application.

We had to determine the application's Java object layering approach.
Using the classic MVC pattern, how were the various MVC components going to interact with each other?
In this case, EJBs would be used for the Model component.
JSPs would be used for the View component. Servlets would be used for the Controller component.
EJBs would commnunicate with the database, using JDBC, through a data access layer.
EJBs would also contain, through helper classes, the Business Logic for the application.

We decided the application would be deployed in several parts or EARs;
User Interface, Reporting, Processes, and Web Services.

The application would be further organized into various projects;
EJBs, Servlets/JSPs, Web Services, App Clients, and Utilities.

Each project would contain a number of packages. Each package would be dedicated to a particular business function.

With these decisions in place, we felt our latest (our third) Java application was off to a great start.

Beginnings are just as important as endings.
Start strong, finish strong.

Speaking of new beginnings...

After more than 30 years, I have decided to "retire" from software development.
I have accepted a new job and a new role in my company, Amway Corp.

This is my last blog entry for Java.net.

Thanks to our esteemed Editor at Java.net, Kevin Farnham, for providing me a forum to tell my stories.
It has been a real thrill and I will be forever grateful to Kevin.

Wish me luck as I transition into my new role.
I wish you all well. Java is in very good hands.