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JavaOne - Day four - 4 - IV - t-shirts via P2P and bling for java.net users

Posted by turbogeek on July 1, 2004 at 3:16 PM PDT

The awards were given out at the end of the main session today. The winners were "The Cyclists". I got to speak to the developer of the software. Silly me forgot to write down his name, but he can be reached at mrjava @ sprint.com and the web site is www.observeit.com (site is not up yet).

As Gosling said, the winner was built with a lot of weirdness and imagination. Here is the list of technology involved:

o J2EE web server for audience participation and media server to relay server link establishment.

o Java Applet for real-time sighting video display

o J2Se Swing app(media server) for graphics and sound rendering.

o J2Se bike relay server - off - bike communications

o Dallas TINI Java Controller = sensors and actuation or the drills A.K.A poor man's servos and light controls.

o JavaCard iButton computer thrown with t-shirts for Java enabled camera phone giveaway.

But there was more to the details! There were two computers in the system on stage that communicated via 802.11 back to the man server to find the IP address of each other. This is the poor man's Peer-to-Peer system. What happens is that the each PC calls the J2EE server (at the developer's house) to get the other peer's IP address. Just before they rolled out, the 802.11 was overloaded by all the attendees and in the last few minutes before they rolled out, they had to rewrite the code to use a hard wired connection that was hastily wired to the computes on the bike. With five minutes to spare the code was patched and tested. Not knowing your IP address is a bit worse than having the chain break (actually it was the master link on the chain that was popped off by two desperate competitors in front of a live audience ). I could not help with the chain, but I did sugest he use JXTA instead of the home grown solution. We will also host the code at Java.net in the Java Education and Learning Community.

I was running around with Bruno (the fellow from Brazil with the Brazilian flag cape and who runs the Java user group community on java.net) and met some guys that will donate free installation software to the Java.net community. No names yet, but look for an announcement soon.

Finally I talked to a fellow from a mining company. They use 802.11 to communicate between their heavy equipment. They have problems communicating and managing their various devices. We talked about JXTA as a solution. Looks like a lot of their problems and allow a multi-ton earth mover to call the office for an oil change via JXTA P2P. Look for JXTA in applications like this real soon.

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