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Databases

In my opinion, SQL Anyhwere is the best RDBMS I can think of. I can remember when we started distributing it in Germany back in the early 1990ies, as one of the first early adopters in this country. Since then, we provided it to hundreds of enterprises, from single-person laptop-only ones to large ones spanning replicated installations crossing country borders. So call me biased in that...
on Jul 3, 2010
If you wonder whether the style of use with JDBC API has an impact of performance, you might like to read my latest blog entry on Head Crashing Informatics. While the entry mostly is about tuning SQL Anywhere's BLOB handling performance, it contains an interesting aspect: There are three ways to deal with BLOBs in JDBC, and the performance difference is tremendous. While obvious for the JDBC...
on Apr 10, 2010
On last saturday I have run a few experimental benchmarks on the typical new generation technology stack (or part of it). What I exactly did was running iAnywhere 10.0.1 database and Sun Application Server 9 (aka "Glassfish" aka "Java EE 5 SDK") in a VMware Server 1.0.3 virtual machine on my private laptop (AMD Turion 64 X2, 2 GB RAM). The benchmark was done using a small test...
on Jan 3, 2010
I used my free day to do some more performance benchmarking using EJB 3.0 and WebServices. As I wrote in my last blog entry on this topic, I was astonished what performance is possible even in a VM on my cheat laptop. But now I invested some more time to tune my laptop (running JkDefrag gave its disk an amazing push) and do an optimization in the application itself: Using precompiled queries...
on Jan 3, 2010
I did some experiments with JPA, which is a really cool and simple API for entity persistence. In fact, writing an entity bean is as simple as writing a pojo plus adding some single annotations like @Entity and @Id (to identify the PK fields). That's it. Cool. :-) See this sample code: @Entity public class MySample { @Id private int x; public int getX() { return this.x; } public...
on Jan 3, 2010
JPA comes with a way of doing triggers, which is pretty cool: EntityListeners. It is a simple POJO that is annotated as EntityListener, and that gets linked to the triggering event by some outside glue. That outside glue can be an XML deployment descriptor (has nothing to do with the EJB 2.1 XML deployment descriptor; is nothing else but an override to the annotations found in the Java source...
on Jan 3, 2010

Community

For meanwhile more than 25 years I am writing computer programs. More than a decade I spent with programs accessing databases, virtually always relational ones. I soon learned that this is rather hard work. Not only that you need to know about the theory behind RDBMS iself, but also you need to know the technical APIs (like ODBC, ADO, RDO, JDBC, JDO, JPA, CMP, ...), the structure of...
on Feb 28, 2010