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J2EE

Say you have a problem with how a particular component renders and you want to do it a bit different. Well in JSF that is not a problem there is a hook-in that you can use to override how a renderer does it rendering. The sample below shows you how to do it. You will have to do 2 things. 1. Register your own renderer for a given renderer type 2. Implement your own renderer. First lets make sure...
on Nov 5, 2013
JavaEE 7 and Glassfish 4.0 were released a little while ago. What is in the future? Well, see the Aquarium blog for the latest Glassfish Roadmap. And that is it. Enjoy!
on Nov 4, 2013
Tyrus 1.3 has been released, get more information here. Or download it from here. Glassfish users should take all the Tyrus JAR files and replace them in the modules directory with the downloaded ones to get Tyrus 1.3 working in Glassfish. And that is it. Enjoy!
on Nov 2, 2013
See the release notes for what was fixed. If you want to download it, see this page for more information. Enjoy!
on Oct 31, 2013
If you have wanted JSF not to store any state now is your chance to try out the stateless mode of JSF. It is as easy as doing the following: <f:view transient="true">  Your regular content</f:view> And voila you are running stateless. If you decide you do want some state to be kept at the server you can use the @xxxScoped annotations on your beans Be aware that...
on Feb 8, 2013
The following blog articles are part of the JSF Validator series Introduction to JSF Validators The JSF Validator API The LengthValidator The LongRangeValidator The DoubleRangeValidator The RegexValidator The RequiredValidator Writing your own Validator Packaging your JSF Validator Multiple component validation The BeanValidator The FacesValidator annotation
on Sep 17, 2012
In the previous blog entry titled "Writing your own validator" you learned how to write a validator and hook it up for validation. At that time we made it all work using the faces-config.xml file. There is however another way, which we will describe below!   package nohelloworld;  @FacesValidator(value="NoHelloWorldValidator")  public class NoHelloWorldValidator...
on Sep 17, 2012
Since JSF 2 it is also possible to use BeanValidation as specified in JSR 303. The following blog article describes how this JSR has been integrated within JSF 2. With the following JSF managed bean. public class UserInfo {    /**     * Stores the username.     */    private String username;    /** ...
on Sep 17, 2012
Writing your own validator is a straightforward process. It involves implementing the Validator API and making sure you register it properly. Say you want to write a validator that will not allow you to use the string "Hello World" as a value.   package nohelloworld;  public class NoHelloWorldValidator implements Validator {        public void...
on Sep 9, 2012
Say you want to make sure that a value is required. <html xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"  xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">  <h:inputText value="#{user.firstName}">   <f:validateRequired/>  </h:inputText> </html> If you want to disable the RequiredValidator on a page you can...
on Sep 7, 2012
If you want to validate input against a regular expression then you would use the RegexValidator. Say you want to make sure only letters are used for a name. <html xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"  xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">  <h:inputText value="#{user.firstName}">   <f:validateRegex pattern=...
on Sep 6, 2012
Just like the LongRangeValidator before the DoubleRangeValidator validates if the given value is within the given range, but then a range of doubles. Say you want to make sure your donors can donate as little as 1.00 but at most 250.00. <html xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"  xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">  <h:inputText value=...
on Sep 5, 2012
The LengthValidator is one of the standard validators that is specified by the JavaServerFaces specification. It allows you to verify (validate) if the proposed input (submitted value) on a given component is valid. Say you want to make sure the minimum length of a password is 6 characters and up to 12 characters. The example below describe how you would put this into a JSF page to make that...
on Sep 4, 2012
During the JSF lifecycle each input value can be validated. As such the JSF runtime allows you to write validators that will take care of that during request processing. Several standard validators are part of the standard JSF runtime. Note that the specification has been written with extension in mind so it is also possible to write your own validator and hook it up for request processing...
on Sep 1, 2012
I am one of the people selected for FishCAT, so let me know what some of the bugs are you think are irritating ;) Or what you think the new version of Glassfish should contain. Or if you already have played around with Glassfish V3 builds, just let me know what worked or did not work for you!
on Aug 21, 2008

Web Applications

If you want to make sure a value is within given Long range then the LongRangeValidator is for you! Say you want to make sure your users are at least 13 but at most 18. <html xmlns:h="http://java.sun.com/jsf/html"  xmlns:f="http://java.sun.com/jsf/core">  <h:inputText value="#{user.age}">   <f:validateLongRange...
on Sep 5, 2012

Web Design

The definition of a Validator according to the Validator interface: void validate(FacesContext context, UIComponent component, Object value) throws ValidatorException The Faces Context is passed in so the validator can introspect various aspects of the request and response. The UI component is passed in because the actual value will be stored in that UI component after it has been...
on Sep 3, 2012