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Extreme Programming

Inside Parse I spent last time on tests only - this time I want to go inside the Parse class. The top of the class reveals strings for leader, tag, body, end, and trailer, as expected. There are also parts and more, which are Parses. A skim through the class, looking for big routines, shows that the constructor, findMatchingEndTag(), removeNonBreakTags(), print(), and footnote() methods seem to...
on Jun 1, 2005
"Fit" is Ward Cunningham's "Framework for Integrated Tests". You can pick up a copy by starting from fit.c2.com. I've used it for a while, and looked at some of its code along the way, but hadn't sat down and really studied it systematically. My plan is to spend an hour at a time, just digging in to what I find and sharing my notes. 1. Download and Compile I download a copy and pull it in to my...
on May 30, 2005
Way back in October 2002, I had the enviable position of ramping up the development effort for the Sun RI for JavaServer Faces. At that time, Test Driven Development (TDD) was just starting to catch on, and I used my position as team leader to mandate (HA!) that we would use TDD on the project. I realized that for any mandate to succeed, it must be easy to implement, so the team and I invested...
on Mar 14, 2005
[Trimmed and crossposted from XPlorations] I don't think the new edition of Extreme Programming Explained has had as much exposure as it deserves. I've summarized its key points, and added a bit of review. http://xp123.com/xplor/xp0502/index.shtml And a few other reviews at http://xp123.com/books/index.htm: Crystal Clear, Alistair Cockburn. Addison-Wesley, 2004. Office Kaizen: Transforming...
on Mar 1, 2005
See www.agile2005.org. The due date for tutorials and workshops is March 1; for Experience reports, research papers, and the educators' symposium is March 15. Call for Participation - Agile 2005 July 24-29, 2005. Marriott Hotel, Denver, Colorado, USA. http://www.agile2005.org March 1: Submissions due for Tutorials and Workshops March 15: Submissions due for Research Papers, Experience...
on Feb 6, 2005
Object Mentor's reviving their XP courses with "Agile/XP Immersion 2"; see http://www.objectmentor.com/Immersion2. March 21-25. I attended the first one of the original series, and really enjoyed it.
on Feb 5, 2005
Reflecting on your process and how to improve it is an important part of agile methods. Later this month, Diana Larsen is leading a class on retrospectives that may be of some interest: "Project Retrospectives and Reviews: A Facilitator's Toolkit," January 24-25, 2005, at Oregon Graduate Institute; http://www.cpd.ogi.edu/coursespecific.asp?pam=1573 She's also announcing another class in April...
on Jan 17, 2005
"Harold and the Purple Crayon" is a children's book where Harold uses his crayon to draw whatever he needs, and then it's real enough to use. Sometimes you want to navigate to a class. One way is to go find it in the list of classes or out on disk. If you have a one-keystroke "jump to definition", one way is to just type the class name into the file you're in, and navigate on that. Yes, it may...
on Jan 6, 2005
I am on one of those projects where I try to introduce XP practices like lightweight documentation and testing. I also happen to work at a large wall street investment bank with alot of money at stake. And as a result -- a pretty stressful and politically charged environment. One thing I've learned through this is to be extaordinarily careful about how concepts are applied and especially how...
on Jan 5, 2005
William Pietri has posted a picture of his team room, at http://www.scissor.com/resources/teamroom/ I'm maintaining a gallery of team rooms, too, at http://xp123.com/xplor/room-gallery/index.shtml. I'd love to have pictures of your team room or charts that you use.
on Dec 24, 2004
So you think you got some Sustainable Pace, and you want to sharpen your axe, so what pops into your head? Fartlek! Alright, well pick your target - not a something huge like doubling the number of stories done. Small activities like integrating, deploying, writing one test would be good places to start. Maintain your form - you know that if your doing XP you're TDDing, PPing, attending...
on Dec 11, 2004
XP2005 has their call for participation out. They'll be at Sheffield University (UK), June 18-23, 2005. See http://www.xp2005.org for more information. IMPORTANT DATES Paper submissions: January 16, 2005 Acceptance notification for full papers: March 6, 2005 Submissions for tutorials, workshops, panels and activities, PhD Symposium, and posters: March 1, 2005 Acceptance notification for...
on Dec 9, 2004
In my last entry, Fartlek - Increasing your Sustainable Pace, I introduced fartleking as a metaphor to increase sustainable pace. I then went on to talk about some of the horrid things we let business do to us in the name of going faster and ended with a personal, touching story to illustrate the importance of Sustainable Pace. John D. Mitchell took issue with my metaphor, in Rhythms in...
on Dec 9, 2004
Those I have coached know when it comes to development I thump the TDD bible, but when it comes to business I preach Sustainable Pace. Business always seems to be interested in increasing the pace and it isn't that hard (to describe). Fartleks a.k.a. "speed-play" is the answer. When fartleking you increase from your long slow pace to a short (the end is in sight) burst of speed, once you...
on Dec 5, 2004
The Scrum gathering was a workshop gathered for a couple days in Denver, this past October. We worked in three groups: metrics, process, and facilitation. (Scrum is an agile process. I think of it as approximately the project management part of XP, though that's of course not fair to either one:) I participated in the facilitation group. (The others were metrics and process.) We spent a lot of...
on Dec 4, 2004
It's been just under a year now since I started practicing XP programming, and I have to admit, as much as it is anathema to my style of programming, it is a flawless system that far surpasses the wildest dreams of my programming expectations. Before I begun on this Odyssey I had a fairly standard view of programming. I was a good programmer; I knew my stuff and was more than willing to learn...
on Sep 21, 2004
Sven Gorts has introduced what he calls Refactoring Thumbnails. These are UML-like diagrams augmented with some flows, and used to summarize refactorings. (For example, the UML might have no words, but rather squiggles to represent identical text in two different classes.) In addition to summarizing the transformation involved in simple refactorings, he uses these to show how large...
on Aug 9, 2004
2004 is a year of revelation for me. Better, Faster, Lighter Java was a fun book to write, and I learned tremendously in writing it. A closer involvement in the Spring project, and in the Java persistence community, also led to similar discoveries for me. It’s humbling to evolve my thought process in this very public forum, and thanks for sharing the ride. In this blog, I’m going to...
on Jul 30, 2004
Somnifugi JMS is a lightweight, single-JVM implementation of the JMS interface. I've used Somnifugi to simplify the threading architecture on a few user interfaces for clients over the years. The architecture has worked well, especially for developers who weren't familiar with Java's multi-threading. I've been meaning to follow up on an article by Johnathan Simon where he hinted that one could...
on Jun 23, 2004
Have you seen the 2-liter water rockets? My wife Maggie and I recently bought a launcher to entertain our kids. We about killed ourselves drinking enough rootbeer to empty the rockets, and then headed to the park. My daughters Kayla and Julia stood slack jawed, staring alternately at the aqua missle and their crazed daddy. You basically take a bike pump, a 2-liter soda bottle, and enough...
on Jun 10, 2004