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Testing

Hello again. Since I posted my first article here I've been asked a number of times: "Why there's no open source tools for quality process? Are there any?" Being a lazy enough, I decided to reply just once in this public forum. Ok, here's the answer: there's a number of open source tools to do a neat automation of one's software quality process. To schedule and execute jobs execution in a...
on Oct 4, 2005
Hi there! Surprisingly, my last post was rated #1 by Google for 'java quality' search and lasted in this position for a few days. My friends were wondering how much I had paid to gain this honorable position. Honestly: I didn't pay a penny for it and I only have to thank those of you, who spent time reading it. So, thank you! I also hope not to disappoint you this time. Moving closer to the...
on Sep 30, 2005
It isn't, perhaps, a secret, that software test development and quality are like a snow ball rolling down a hill: and as it reaches further towards the end of the slope, harder to stop... and think. Think about what is done right; what missed, and how I can do this better, if only I had another chance. We all have heard (or know from a real experience) about a number of testing types:...
on Sep 23, 2005
This article at TheServerSide was pointed to by a poster on javalobby claiming it's an example of how "ugly" annotations are. Hmmm... They're different alright, but ugly? To each their own I suppose. Test framework comparison, by Justin Lee, July 2005, TheServerSide.com He goes over a couple new test frameworks and how annotations have affected their design. I guess JUnit is no longer the king...
on Sep 8, 2005
Like I said in my previous posting, I'm looking at the quality processes in open source projects. I'm studying how we in the Java quality team might be more open about what we're doing. On my way home tonight I stopped at a geeks book store and found Succeeding with Open Source. It has part of a chapter devoted to quality processes, and thought I'd share a little. The context of the chapter is...
on Aug 16, 2005
Today I spent a few hours looking at the presence of quality organizations in different open source projects. Typically you think of an open source project has being some software developers scratching an itch, and so the processes circle around the software developers. So I expected to find little presence of quality organizations within the various open source projects. The results of my...
on Aug 12, 2005
The leader of the Findbugs project, Bill Pugh visited Sun this week. He gave talks to various teams about the tool, showing its usefulness. One of the talks was to the management of my team, the Java Quality Engineering organization. It's a real interesting tool, doing what's called static analysis. If you haven't read about it, the basic technique is to scan through the classfiles (not source...
on Aug 6, 2005
I see there's some excitement over Chet's MVM weblog posting. My bailiwick here is Quality, so I just want to toss in a comment on the MVM subject from this point of view. Let me start by saying MVM is an interesting idea ... I've heard the MVM give his presentation to the Performance group, of which Chet is a part. He's certainly done some really good work to solve some really sticky problems...
on Jul 25, 2005
This is prompted by a feature request I saw on the javadesktop.org JDIC bulletin board: javadesktop.org/forums/thread.jspa?messageID=99951 As I mentioned earlier, I've spent more than a few brain cycles thinking about GUI test automation. It's been so much that at times I've been worried about my sanity - how many people do you know daydream about the minute details of GUI interactions, looking...
on Jul 19, 2005
My first posting drew a question "does Sun use 'test first development' practices". So, let's talk about that a bit. I can only speak for the Java team as that's where I work. You have to remember that Java is a 10+ year old project with a lot of history. "History" can mean, as it does in this case, that procedures we've been following for 10+ years often interferes with adopting the latest-...
on Jul 13, 2005
I am new to the java.net blogging crew, and since this is my first posting here I thought to introduce myself. My name is David Herron and I work in the Java SE Quality Engineering team. I have also been blogging at http://blogs.sun.com/robogeek if you want to see what I've been saying in the past, and I have a personal blog site at 7gen.com. What I expect to bring to the java.net blogs is...
on Jul 8, 2005
Last month, I gave a no value added link to Kent Beck's Future of Developer Testing. Dominique put up some great notes on the talk and got me thinking a bit more about Barriers to Developer Testing and the cost of unit testing. Watching the Extreme Programming Yahoo Group, I've seen XPers make statements that comparing lines of production code vs. lines of test code it comes out near 1:1,...
on Jan 16, 2005
The Furious Purpose blog entry,Mock roles, not objects mentions a paper given at the last OOPSLA on how to think about mocking in terms of roles that need to be fulfilled. Partly, the blog entry is about the benefits of TDD (Test-Driven Development). If you're not hip to TDD yet, check out Kent Beck's book Test Driven Development: By Example. In my mind, however, there's something a bit more...
on Jan 12, 2005
The Patriot Act, among other things, requires companies comply with certain types of reporting. I can't help but wonder how bugs play into this... there have been reports that there is no way to get off of no fly lists, what if an off by one bug put you on one? But false positives are two easy and most the time only hurt the individual, what about false negatives? What if Sybase...
on Dec 22, 2004
I saw a link to Kent Beck's Future of Developer Testing from Nov. 17th, on scene's clips. 60 minutes of Kent talking about Developer Accountability, Software Health and a few other things. One of those other things Kent expressed, and I have long been to scared to say, is that one of the driving forces behind development job off-shoring, is business looking for more accountability, not...
on Dec 13, 2004
Tom talked in The Problem with Unit Testing about Unit testing. Even though that I agree with most of it I disagree with the view that Unit Testing is only a safety net. The only person responsible of the quality of the software is the author himself and he/she should be held accountable for that. Therefore, in my opinion, writing Unit tests is not just a good habit but an essential part of the...
on Oct 12, 2004
Marcus Baker makes the claim that logging is evil. I cannot agree. To be specific, he claims that "if there really is a chance of error at that point then we should fix the probable root cause." To me, this seems a wee bit lazy. As developers, we are paid to make careful decisions about how our time is best spent, and deciding to spend the time without considering the payoff is not a good...
on Sep 23, 2004