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J2SE

In this post, I try to give a reasonable account of Java's error handling system being as it is that the handling of errors is a concern that any reasonable programming language must find some way to contend with. Java's error handling methodology is based on an idea of exceptions. An exception is a condition that prevents your program from further executing along the current path. It signifies...
on Mar 5, 2014
If you have followed previous posts, you might begin to perceive a pattern in the semantics of the Java programming language. If not, it might help to go over previous posts as I tend to return to expand on previous topics or add clearer examples as time permits. Inner classes might at first seem like a whole new language to the uninitiated but they are a nice feature in Java that allow you to...
on Feb 20, 2014
In the normal course of solving a general programming problem, it is almost certain that you will become compelled to create, and identify useful ways by which one may hold any number of objects within your program. In Java, you are normally inclined toward the array as the natural choice for holding a group of primitives, but this has the obvious limitation of being of a fixed size, whereas,...
on Feb 12, 2014
Interfaces are completely abstract classes in Java that provide you with a uniform way to properly delineate the structure or inner workings of your program from its publicly available interface, with the consequence being a greater amount of flexibility and reusable code as well as more control over how you create and interact with other classes. More precisely, they are a special construct in...
on Jan 18, 2014
In object oriented programming, polymorphism is a feature that allows you to provide a single interface to varying entities of the same type. This is analogous to the interpretation of the same concept in the field of Biology. To understand how this works in Java, we must consider inheritance and the ways by which the Java programming language makes method calls. When you create a class in Java...
on Jan 7, 2014
There are mainly two ways by which one may reuse classes in Java. The first is by way of composition. Composition provides a way to compose your classes from objects of existing classes, essentially making use of the objects' functionality as opposed to its form. The second method is by what we call inheritance, which describes how one may derive a new class as a type of an existing class. With...
on Dec 18, 2013
A key consideration for the library designer in the normal conduct of operations is maintaining the ability to make changes or improvements to the library at any time without requiring the consumers (client programmers) of that library to do the same. In Java, a library consists of a logical grouping of .class files packaged together to make a working program. An apt analogy to this point may be...
on Dec 8, 2013
Operators in Java work much like they do in mathematics, producing a value from one or more operands. An operand is any quantity on which an operation can be performed and in Java these include primitives and objects. Basic arithmetic operators in Java include addition (+), subtraction (-), multiplication (*), division (/) and the assignment operator (=), all of which constitute the binary...
on Nov 11, 2013
Much of what you do in Java is to define classes that package data and functionality together by concept to represent the desired problem-space element. When you instantiate a class, you create an object that has it's own piece of memory made up of other objects. Java has a peculiar means of manipulating these elements in memory. This is to say even though you treat everything as an object, you...
on Oct 25, 2013