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Business

http://www.ddj.com/documents/s=9211/ddj050201dnn/ I know I'm late to the party on this article, so please excuse my tardiness. I'd like to offer my thoughts on how Microsoft and Sun have approached the problem of bringing more "ease of development" to their respective platforms. According to Mr. Grimes's article, Microsoft marketing was behind the introduction of VB.NET. Their motivation was to...
on Mar 8, 2005
Well, I am a sucker for discussions about risk and software development. There are some interesting tidbits in Tiwana and Keil's: the one-minute risk assessment tool article for the ACM's Queue magazine. Alas, there are some fundamental problems with the article. So, definitely read it, but with a few grains of salt :-). First off, while they noted the (potential of) self-selection bias, that's...
on Mar 1, 2005
CNet reports that Microsoft is offering $5 (yes, 5) for data loss due to it's new AntiSpyware software that's in beta testing. Gee, thanks. That will buy me a cup of coffee so I can calm down after you destroy my data. Yeah, sure. This is another case of how Microsoft (and so many other organizations) just doesn't understand (or care) how enormous an impact their buggy software has on users....
on Feb 25, 2005
I recently came across a discussion of WebForms2, and after checking out the links I've come away pleasantly optimistic that building form-centric web applications is about to get simpler. The WebForms2 proposal is a product of WhatWG (the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group). WhatWG is a loose consortium of browser manufacturers who have banded together to make the development of...
on Feb 20, 2005
My little girl has this habit of pouring way too much milk into her bowl of cereal. Then, she whines and complains when we tell her to drink up the extra milk after the cereal is gone so it doesn't go to waste. Yesterday, she got quite snippy when I dared to suggest that she try pouring less milk into the bowl. Gee, she sounds like a lot of managers and developers of software. Though, to be more...
on Feb 17, 2005
Eben Moglen heads up this new organization, the Software Freedom Law Center, to "provide provide legal representation and other law related services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software." The center has been established with a $4 million fund raised through the OSDL. Note that the free assistance is only available to eligible (i.e., non-profit) F/OSS projects that can't afford...
on Feb 1, 2005
I'll likely be migrating my BLOG to a DataDirect Technologies domain very soon, but in the interests of keeping my Java.Net blog fresh and up to date, I thought I'd include the following as an example of what the next year holds for me: http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/050125/255970_1.html and also: http://www.marketwatch.com/tools/quotes/newsarticle.asp?siteid=mktw&sid=7869&guid=%7B59DBA505%...
on Jan 25, 2005
Well, there's seems to be a fair bit of discussion lately about various approaches to making XML less of a bloated sack of protoplasm. Technically speaking there's a Sun article on talking about the Fast InfoSet draft specification. More generically speaking, here's a CNet article asking: How do we make XML faster? Alas, I don't see anyone asking moderately important questions like: If binary...
on Jan 19, 2005
I've seen my share of death march projects, we all have (there are alot of them after all). What's amazing to me is not that they exist, but rather the sheer quantity and magnitude of them. I read this article in the Times this morning. It talks about a project to update the technical infrastructure of the FBI. It sounds like several projects I've worked on -- tell tale signs of death marches...
on Jan 14, 2005
MacWorld Expo 2005 is the consumer-focused show/exhibit/conference for all things related to Apple Computers. I've been going to the show for the last two years because Steve Jobs is funny as a keynote speaker and because I switched to a 17" Al-PowerBook when they came out. Alas, in stark contrast from years past, Apple seems to have stopped giving out goodies to attendees of the keynote (...
on Jan 12, 2005
According the a recent article in the JDJ, the return of technology has begun. The much-anticipated post-PC era has finally arrived, and the technology budgets will rise again ... soon. Good news, to be sure ... a return to the roaring 90s? Hmmmmm. Probably not. In contrast, an article published in Network Computing last month points to more-of-the-same galacial growth rate in IT spending...
on Jan 11, 2005
When will there be enough evidence that death marches are unsuccessful/unhealthy enough to prevent them? Most excuses I hear from business are arguments from ignorance. Once you address ignorance, business moves to the next most convenient fallacy. At what point is it in the best interest of business to understand how high project failure and employee health costs affect their bottom line?
on Jan 9, 2005
Sun's Graham Hamilton has just announced the release of the Java Compatibility Kit (JCK) for J2SE under a read-only license. Whoopity do! If, heaven forbid, one wants to actually use the JCK at all, you are required to either submit to the onerous SCSL (Sun Community Source License) or upcoming JDL (Java Development License). If you want to use it commercially, you have negotiate a commercial...
on Dec 13, 2004
Is Paul Graham, a very open and strong opponent of Java, using it himself? Well, not exactly. But Paul Graham's former company ViaWeb that was sold to Yahoo is. The last issue of Swing Sightings points to the Java based Yahoo site builder application for small business. Ordinarily, I wouldn't make a big deal out of something like this. But a decent amount of effort was spent in Hackers and...
on Nov 29, 2004
The Kodak v. Sun suit has gone against Sun. This is hard evidence that the software patent system is deeply broken. I know this isn't news; you probably already knew. One approach is to think that software patents are just plain wrong. Maybe so, but this isn't obvious to me. Patents have protected other technologies, and they might be able to handle software. Software patents as currently...
on Oct 7, 2004
My old friend Peter Karlsson (formerly of Sun) recently wrote to say he had gotten married in Singapore (which is itself of rite of passage) and had also joined the ranks at Micro$oft. I was pleased to learn of his wedded bliss, and naturally a little saddened by the M$-gig news ... having once evangelized with him on behalf of Sun and Java, it was troubling to learn that Peter had had to...
on Oct 1, 2004
SAKAI Release Candidate 2 It's not fair to evaluate the current release candidate against the goals of the SAKAI program. It is widely accepted that these aims will not be realized until version 2.0 in the spring/summer of next year. The current release is a snapshot of the code base that will be deployed at the leading SAKAI contributing universities. This fact alone is a testament to the...
on Sep 10, 2004
JXTATM For Business… Proven! Well, I keep saying that JXTA™ is where business needs to go to make a buck. Companies are indeed listening. 312 Inc. has just released a new JXTA product called LeanOnMe. LeanOnMe is a Peer-to-Peer off site backup tool. Simply, you choose the files you want backed up and choose another computer in the 312 Inc. peer network and your files can be...
on Aug 21, 2004
The walls of Mordor My 6 year old daughter was fascinated watching me watch this little guy taking a ring somewhere. As I have watched all the three films it was kind of a deja vu for her. Her question was where is this guy taking this ring to. And she wanted to see where he is going to drop it. She was not really concerned about the emotion in the middle. She just wanted to see the scene where...
on Aug 11, 2004
Eric Chabrow recently contributed an article to Information Week in which he analyzed data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics specific to IT professionals. Some 160,000 fewer Americans identify themselves as IT professionals as was the case in 2001. At the same time, the total U.S. employment in IT fell from 3.5 million to 3.2 million -- shrinking some 7...
on Aug 9, 2004