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Web Services and XML

It actually happened a few weeks ago already, but I simply didn't find the time to spread the word earlier -- just too much other stuff to do (see end of posting), so I tell you now: WebDAV Support for JAX-RS 1.2 is out! What has happened since 1.1? First of all, 1.2 is a complete internal overhaul, which not only finally is covered with unit tests rather completely (which revealed several...
on Mar 1, 2014

Programming

One day I found myself in the situation that I had to write a unit test which checks whether my code is annotated in a particular way. I wondered how one could do that without doing an integration test that actually processes that annotations. My first idea was to use the Reflection API, which in fact worked, but was not looking smart. In fact, I wanted to have a Hamcrest matcher instead, since...
on Dec 27, 2013
I hate adding lots of huge multi-JAR all-purpose common libraries to rather small projects! Huge footprint just for a single class is a side effect of many popular frameworks, unfortunately, due to rather coarse-grained modularity. So I started to publish some of my commons (LPGL'ed) code as single-class self-contained artifacts on The Maven Central Repository. You simple need a Range<T>...
on Sep 7, 2012
Meanwhile I am looking back to more than 25 years of programming, and more than a decade I spent in a very sensible area where quality (in the sense of zero failures) plays a big role. So call me "sensible" for quality. For long years "we" (i. e. developers) had hard work to do using simple command lines tools like vi etc., but meanwhile there are great, even free,...
on Dec 29, 2010
There are times when things hurt so much that you feel urged to blog about them once solved. This is one of them. Our company is using XSL heavily for reporting (generating vector charts in PDFs on the fly from data analyzed by GlassFish), so it is not very amazing that we found some bugs in the XSL transformer (a.k.a "JAXP Implementation") contained in GlassFish. As we're not so fast...
on Mar 16, 2010

GUI

Swing is not dead, still. While a whole lot of evangelists try to talk it dead, it is still part of the JRE. While SWT is not, still. And while JavaFX is not, still. Dispite all hypes and rumors. It is not even declared to be deprecated or obsolete. So in fact, there is no other real alternative to Swing as long as the GUI must work solely with JRE means (I won't say AWT is an alternative). And...
on Sep 7, 2012

Community

It eventually happened that I had to ensure that a class of mine is annotated in a particular way (I didn't want to bind the whole framework that uses the annotation just to ensure this single issue, as this was a unit test but not an integration test). So I wrote my own Hamcrest matcher with few pieces of reflection inside. Short time later I noticed that Hamcrest co-owner Nat PRYCE already did...
on Sep 1, 2012
For many years I am using XSLT now for a lot of tasks in both, development and runtime environments: Source generation, creating HTML from XML data, or even rendering SVG vector graphics from XML finance data. But what really bothered me was that the XSLT transformer contained in Java (even in Java 6's latest release) was just able to do XSLT 1.0 but not XSLT 2.0. XSLT (and XPath) 2.0 comes with...
on Feb 6, 2010
Over the past decade, OpenSource became a big hype. At the peak of the hype, big stakeholders like IBM, Oracle and Sun (and even Microsoft and SAP) turned a lot of their previously proprietary code into OpenSource. While they tell us that they do it because they are so noble and like to exploit the community's knowledge, typically the open sourced software is only for free in part or is still...
on Dec 10, 2009