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Business

There are two subtle but unique resources in open source which, if acquired and carefully leveraged, can give your business a leg up over some of the big players in the market. One of these resources is control over the copyright of the software. The other is control over the brand. Both of these resources are incredibly important over the lifetime of a successful software project but are often...
on Oct 21, 2003
What do we mean by open standards anyhow? My last entry evoked a certain amount of name-calling in the arena of open standards. Today I'd like to explore just what "Open Standards" might mean. This will seem very simplistic to many of you, but I hope it’s helpful to sort things out in a simplistic way. I’d like to start with some definitions: Open - Open for third parties to support and...
on Oct 21, 2003
Can 'standards' and 'standardization' be two unrelated concepts? There was an article in yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, Cloud Over Sun Microsystems: Plummeting Computer Prices, which dissects Sun’s current financial and strategic challenges. One of the interesting claims in the article is that "Scott McNealy, Sun's chief executive for the past 19 years, long resisted the standardization...
on Oct 17, 2003
I recently wrote a paper for The SAP Developer Network on user interface technology in the enterprise. I'd like to pull out one small section of that paper for further discussion here: There are three main factors that affect the ROI of any UI technology: ease of use of the application, ease of deployment and on-going maintenance, and ease of initial development. Based on the total cost...
on Oct 14, 2003
Blarg #1: Why are JSPs still relevant? You seem like the perfect guy to ask. Let me explain the question; I'm in projects that run for a very long time, we have to maintain them and add features for at least a year, but probably longer. Having bare JSPs (or even really nice tagged ones) makes this hard to maintain and keep bug-free for a very simple reason; The application programmer has to do...
on Oct 9, 2003
Is Microsoft ready to move onto the 'extinguish' phase with the Web browser? Microsoft is renowned for its "embrace, extend, extingish" strategy which involves enthusiastically embracing and championing a new standard, as a way to become the market leader in that standard, then extending that standard with proprietary technology that lets Microsoft lock in customers and lock out the...
on Oct 9, 2003

Tools

Oracle has relased today JDeveloper 9.0.3.3, a maintenance release for its IDE. It has dozens of bug fixes, most of them related to BC4J (its MVC framework).
on Oct 21, 2003
Rapid application development tools let you put together a great-looking mock-up of your app in no time, but often are of little use for the production version of your system. Visual GUI builders and data-aware controls are two such culprits. In yesterday’s post, I mentioned that all too often tools that help developers put out a really quick version of their application are frustrating to...
on Oct 15, 2003

Community

Back in May we finally got around having a London based Java meetup where a small handful of techies turned up to a pub and chatted about Java. Month by month, numbers gradually increased and all was looking good until the Java Meetup website started charging a fee for some of their services. Thankfully, Jez came up with the London Java Meetup blog. If you've been following the blog, you'll...
on Oct 21, 2003
Hi, I saw your blog on java.net and thought I'd ask a couple of questions.... Do you think all Java/J2EE developers should be blogging, or just those that are senior, or in consultant roles? Should blog-reading be for general education/feel of the "community", or do you think blogs are only useful when searching for answers to specific problems? If everyone should blog, where do I go to get...
on Oct 14, 2003

Deployment

Hey all. Been a long time I rapped at ya, so here it goes. I was heading over to barnes and nobles tonight to pick up a copy of Enterprise Application Patterns - a book about design patterns for message systems that I wrote a chapter for (www.eaipatterns.com). They didnt have it in yet (poop!), but while I was there, I thought I would check out some CDs (Outkast, Aphex and Seal if anyone is...
on Oct 20, 2003
I was just recently faced with taunting task to revamping the transaction handling of the J2EE server without breaking it but improving performance and removing any resource leaks. Already two developers tried to do this but had problems to understand the existing code in the first place and so I failed, too. If we could not improve the code we had to dump the implementation and start all over...
on Oct 10, 2003

Web Services and XML

Ray Ozzie [IMHO but IANAL] effectively demonstrates that 1993-vintage Lotus Notes had "prior art" that -- in a rational world -- would invalidate the Eolas patent on embedded hypermedia. This patent has resulted in a large judgment against Microsoft and raised the very real possibility that the Web browser as we know it must change drastically or infringe on the patent. Jon Udell suggests that...
on Oct 19, 2003
I do a lot of freelance writing and editing, particularly of Java- and XML-related content. Recently, I was tech. editing a piece, over several articles, on XML Signatures and XML Encryption. The article was pretty well-written, technically accurate... and utterly boring. So my question is, "Is someone actually using this stuff?" Being an editor and advocate of open source, I often live in a bit...
on Oct 17, 2003

J2EE

It's common that you'll find somebody using XDoclet to help build their EJBs, but how often do you find people using it to help with the J2EE web tier? In his recent weblog, Dave says he is trying to convince his team that using XDoclet is the way to go for generating artefacts like tag library descriptors and the web.xml file. I must admit that while XDoclet is very useful when building EJBs, I...
on Oct 16, 2003
I've been looking at integrating Apache and Tomcat on my PowerBook so that my dev environment more closely matches the box hosting my domain. Although I really do like open source, one of the biggest problems for me is that I always seem to need software that I have to build from the original source. This is one of the reasons I bought a Mac. I have tried running some of the various Linux...
on Oct 13, 2003
As Simon Brown pointed out the J2EE specification restrict you to access files on the file system but sometimes you have to and then you need to control the damage by keeping the breach of the specification local and not to spread it all over your code. Being confronted with this question just recently I came up with these ‘solutions’: Putting a file into the archive and read it out as...
on Oct 9, 2003

J2SE

OK, I admit it. I'm a bit of a trend-happy person, at least in the computer world. When all the buzz around Mac OS X took off last year, I got pretty excited and jumped in full-steam. It helped that I was editing the first Java and Mac OS X title for O'Reilly (Mac OS X for Java Geeks), and so I took off for bluer... er... grayer... skies. This was all pretty good; however, for the record, I was...
on Oct 15, 2003
I got a lot of questions about JNI after my Mac OS X for Java Geeks book was published. I just wrote an article for ONJava, Mac OS X JNI Revisited. While writing the article, I was mostly focused on answering reader questions, but as I was working, I started to wonder why JNI development was just so hard. When I was working at Apple, there was some interesting work done on native integration...
on Oct 9, 2003

P2P

P2P is how the internet was supposed to constructed. Instead we got an client - server architecture. So says this incredibly interesting and challenge-issuing report from the MIT Enterprise Technology Review. The most recent example of how this top current top-down architecture can cripple the internet is the VeriSign SiteFinder debacle. One top level screw up and the whole thing breaks....
on Oct 10, 2003