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J2EE

While Matt was talking about the Tomcat Service Manager, coincidentally, I was trying to install Tomcat 4 as a service on a Windows 2000 machine yesterday. For various reasons, I didn't want to install Tomcat via the .exe and therefore had to hunt around for the command line that installs the NT service. For (my) future reference, here it is, split over several lines for readability. set...
on Sep 26, 2003
In the first posting in her new weblog, Anne Thomas Manes talks about the idea of porting Jakarta to Mono, the project to implement C# and the core of the CLI from .NET on Linux. She says: But from the moment Miguel initiated the Mono project, I’ve been worried about its future potential. I’ve feared that it would go the way of DCOM on Unix. (DCOM is an Open Group standard – and Microsoft...
on Sep 14, 2003

Open Source

I've found I want to reuse code from almost every project I've ever worked on. Plus other people treat my code as library code years longer than I thought possible. So when I create Java code, I produce reusable .jars of code. Structuring the project correctly at the beginning to help reuse seems to be important, but isn't without cost. I have settled on one way, but am not convinced it's the...
on Sep 25, 2003
I plan to use autoboxing in a project, so I'm responding to Erb Cooper's damning blog, "The Terror That Is Autoboxing." I haven't read the spec yet -- Only JCP members have had the chance. I think we should reserve judgment at least until we can see what the JSR expert group has come up with. Under the eye-catching headline, Erb's complaint is that autoboxing could create a lot of objects for no...
on Sep 18, 2003

Community

I spend most of my time as a Java developer happily writing code without explicitly thinking about encapsulation, polymorphism, and inheritance as underlying principles. I mean those things are given. It would be like noticing wheels are round each time I get in my car. Just like I exploit the roundness of my tires as I tool down the street, I make use of the object-oriented features of Java...
on Sep 24, 2003
Lately you hear many software engineers complaining about competition in the software industry from foreign workers or foreign companies starting to compete. Finally, it seems, that the US is not an island anymore and that we are facing major competition. For me, I cannot comprehend the outcry maybe because I had to fight, learn, change and risk a secure lifestyle to become what I am now. That...
on Sep 18, 2003
I wanted to start my weblog at Java.net a little bit differently but as a former H1-B visa holder Sue’s Spielman weblog with the title “Outsourcing in my company? I do not think so.” stroke a cord and I had to respond. The most replies turn around these sentences: I am a true believe that the legislation currently being proposed to lower the H-1B and L-1B visa quotas will not go far enough. I...
on Sep 12, 2003
The JCP is were we define the Java standards. It is an important process to guarantee at the same time that the technology evolves fast enough to keep it competitive, and also that it maintains the expected compatibility. To make this happen, the process has to reflect the needs and expectations of the full Java Community, not only the point of view of a few vendors. But the JCP may be not what...
on Sep 10, 2003
Last week I spent a much needed vacation in The Outer Banks. If you ever see a sticker with OBX in a circle on it, that's the Outer Banks. Beautiful and isolated barrier islands off of the coast of North Carolina, they provide great rest and relaxation. And also the opportunity to think about how technology fits in our lives. I've got lots of new ideas to discuss in my coming entries, but one in...
on Sep 9, 2003
You may not be able to socialize me (just ask my inlaws or come on my next extended family vacation), but at least socialize my development tools. Social software is slow to make it's way into development tools. Why is this important? Consider the Java platform. The strength and value of the Java platform is directly derived from collaboration among a community. I would argue that the amount...
on Sep 8, 2003

Business

My company is not really an eXtreme Programming shop, but we are somewhat inspired by it. We are currently doing a project in which some people are involved in pair programming. I recently witnessed an amusing situation involving this practice. The team that works at the other desk in my office found a bug which they could not figure out. They came to the conclusion that it might be in the...
on Sep 23, 2003
Industry gurus claiming that technology no longer matters to Corporate America may be drawing the wrong conclusion from the wrong evidence. Just wanted to let everyone know that I wrote an article titled Building software that matters that was published on ZDNet today.
on Sep 17, 2003
I noticed that Chris Campbell's blog often includes a note about what music he was listening to as he wrote. This seems like a nice personal touch so I thought I'd copy it. I'm listening to a funny John Prine song about predicting the future and the chorus goes like this: We are living in the future, I'll tell you how I knowI read it in the paper fifteen years agoWe're all driving...
on Sep 16, 2003
If the IT industry wants to be more like other, mature manufacturing industries, then large vendors need to be willing and able to integrate and resell software components as easily as they do hardware parts. We’re exhibiting at Oracle World in San Francisco this week. Yesterday, I watched Scott McNealy give a keynote address. It was as entertaining as always. One of the points he made, which...
on Sep 10, 2003

Deployment

XML and SOAP messages may mask the the underlying infrastructure from developers but the data center still needs to be brand aware. There are many conversations on the topic of Java vs. .NET and how Web Services might be the holy grail or glue to bring it all together. Philip Brittan points out some interesting things in his Microsoft and Web Services weblog entry that got me to thinking about...
on Sep 23, 2003
I recently wrote an article, "Create Desktop Applications with Java-Based Web Technologies" for O'Reilly ONJava.com, and I was just pondering some of the feedback I got. (If you're too busy to read the article, basically I write about using a web application in a bundled Tomcat to build a desktop application w/installer). First off, people seem to think that bandwidth is *awfully* cheap nowadays...
on Sep 22, 2003

J2SE

Don't I have anything good to say about anything? Well, yes I do. I have learned to love Python. Which means I should not be a stickler for strong typing, and therefore autoboxing should be right up my alley. Let me tell you about something that always drives me crazy. I read articles about how to optimize Java code. One warning often heard is that creating a lot of objects has a high...
on Sep 11, 2003
One of the only websites that I can access from the client site that I'm on is the IBM site, and I must admit that it's not on my list of Java related sites that I regularly visit. So, scanning through some of the forums I came across this thread about the overhead of performing object casting in Java. Interesting, and something that I've never really thought about before. I can certainly see...
on Sep 9, 2003

Web Services and XML

Recently I posted about SAML's wide adoption and its next steps. Well, SAML V1.1 has now become an OASIS Standard through a strong show of support from OASIS members, and I can report that the SAML committee's face-to-face meeting this week to plan out the features of V2.0 was a big success. If you haven't run across the Security Assertion Markup Language before, here's the basic idea. SAML...
on Sep 11, 2003

Distributed

Somnifugi JMS is an implementation of the Java Messaging Service built on top of Doug Lea's Channels. This JMS implementation runs inside a single JVM, quickly delivering messages between java Threads. A few years back, I created Somnifugi JMS to speed up a project where the architects had gone overboard with messaging. I used Somnifugi JMS to prototype and test the next project, and left it in...
on Sep 11, 2003