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Business

A few weeks ago, Tesla, the company I work for, sent all its employees to a non-techie workshop. One of the videos that was presented there contained the following sentence: "When paradigms change, everyone gets back to zero". That sentence got stuck into my mind because it reminded me of the OOP-to-AOP transition we are experiencing right now. The first article I read about AOP and Java was...
on Aug 6, 2003
What is Microsoft trying to do? Microsoft is the uncontested champion of the desktop. In the business world, they own essentially the entire client-side market. This is a huge advantage for them. But it is also a limitation. In order to fuel its growth, Microsoft must find new, less-tapped-out markets to go after. The server room is one such market. Microsoft is already strong there, but...
on Aug 6, 2003
If you could change EJBs, what would you do? If you had full power to add features or redesign the old ones, what would be different today? Well, in fact, you have the power to do it, but you need to be fast! JSR-220 is in its early stages and during JavaOne Linda DeMichiel, the spec lead, made it clear she wants to get input from the community. I attended her session about EJB 2.1 just because I...
on Aug 5, 2003
There is a natural evolution of platform technologies from document publishing to forms processing to application delivery. The Web is the leading example of this, but Adobe Acrobat PDF and Microsoft InfoPath are on their way. The W3C has finally published its specification for XForms 1.0, after much delay and without the participation of Microsoft (not surprisingly). XForms is intended to...
on Aug 5, 2003
A month ago I posted a fateful blog entry, "Hey Apple, Got J2ME?", which continues to draw counter blogs, email, and online responses. There's enough interest in this that I thought a follow-up might be in order. One thing is abundantly clear from the discussion: Java developers are very interested in seeing J2ME development tools supported by somebody on Mac OS X. Several readers posted...
on Aug 4, 2003
If you have been to the last edition of JavaOne, then you probably have seen me :-) I was one of the crazy, shameless Brazilian guys who attended the conference this year. No, I wasn't the "Brazilian superman", as one guy who works for Sun named Bruno Souza, our Javaman. :-) But, getting back to the point, there is a lot more about Java development and Brazil than you might know. To begin with,...
on Aug 4, 2003
I have a big black phone with lots of buttons on my desk. I have a very small silver phone that I carry around with me all the times. I use each of these phones on a daily basis. Although they perform the same basic function (allow me to call other people and to receive calls), and they cost roughly the same, they are quite different in a number of ways. Some of those differences make sense...
on Jul 31, 2003
In spite of all of the abstract tech talk and demo code and articles I've been involved with over the years while advocating Java technology, at the end of the day any technology, Java included, is only useful when somebody finds something interesting to do with it. To that end, I enjoyed Jack Shirazi's recent blog entry on Java Case Studies and the J2ME stats URLs posted in response by...
on Jul 30, 2003
Before I get much further in my Blog, I just want to make one thing perfectly clear: I love servers. Or more accurately, I love having my applications and data on servers, and then I like to just forget about those servers. I want them to be someone else’s concern. I simply want my applications and my data to be wherever I need them. I want them to be backed up without my thinking about it....
on Jul 30, 2003

Tools

In my years as a professional programmer I have used many Revision Control Systems (RCSes). It's that software that manages and protects the software you use. One of the tools of the toolmaker. Many companies pay tens of thousands of dollars for this software, often licensing it per-seat, and yet a perfectly good free alternative exists: CVS. In fact I will argue that there almost no reasons not...
on Aug 6, 2003

J2EE

Well ... it looks like our work on Professional JSP, 3rd Edition (previously titled Professional JSP 2.0, and now to be published by Apress) is almost at an end. It's currently slated for a September release and Amazon is now listing it, albeit with an incorrect authors list. I imagine that Sam, Dave, Matt and the other authors are looking forward to this being released as much as I am. If you...
on Aug 6, 2003

Community

There has been some great talk about usability over the last week. Most of us here are primarily developers or technical managers. I want to remind everybody that there is a whole field of study around usability with several books, websites, conferences, and workshops to help you design your applications. I think its great that we are all talking about usabiliy. I in fact have worked as a...
on Aug 5, 2003
The Austin JUG held its July meeting two days ago. The topic was "JavaOne 2003 Recap." We had a great turnout (close to 100 people crammed into our meeting location) and the level of interest was high. Five members who attended JavaOne gave a short talk on their experience at the conference and participated in the discussion panel that ensued. What I particularly enjoyed was how...
on Jul 31, 2003
I took another look at SwingSightings recently, and something struck me -- most of the user interfaces (UIs) for the Swing applications are not very good. I'm not naming names and I'm not saying everything is bad (there are in fact some pretty cool apps up there). What I am saying is that on a whole they are not so great. Since we love Java, we can see the potential in these applications. We can...
on Jul 30, 2003

J2SE

I'm currently reading (and reviewing for JavaRanch) Mac OS X for Java Geeks by Will Iverson and I'm surprised at how good the integration between the core Java platform and Mac OS X really is. Okay, I knew that Apple ships JDK 1.3 and 1.4 along with OSX, but I never realised that you could build a Java application and package it up to look like a regular native app wihout running your code...
on Aug 5, 2003
Years ago, I worked at CNN Headline News as a Writer / Associate Producer, which pretty much meant I was an editor, except they paid me the Writer/AP salary (the editors, in turn, were really producers, etc., up and down the corporate ladder). At the time, the de facto standard for newsroom computer systems was "Basys", which wired dumb terminals to a mainframe, and let users view directories,...
on Aug 1, 2003

Games

A little while ago I mentioned that I was looking into development of some Palm applications. I've been torn between C/C++ development and Java, and digging into the tool set available led to some interesting findings. Preliminary investigation into the Java realm left me feeling a bit underwhelmed. I kept getting the feeling that the commercial vendors were more interested in pushing a (poorly...
on Aug 4, 2003
I was looking at the games site last night, and was surprised to find that only one game was shipped in a binary format and ready to play: bouldercat. That really disappointed me. I just wanted to waste time--not join projects, download source files from CVS, spend some time figuring out why the build process won't work in my environment, and maybe end up with something playable. I understand...
on Aug 3, 2003
Ever get that feeling? The glitch in the Matrix? The feeling of Deja-vu that is just so strong you can't shake it from the front of your brain? After finishing the new book, The Masters of Doom, the story of how John Romero and John Carmack (Surgeon John and Engine John) started id Software, defined the First Person Shooter (FPS) and changed the game industry forever, I get the feeling that...
on Aug 1, 2003

Databases

I was working on a Perl project this weekend. (You know, Perl. "It's like Java, only it lets you deliver on time and under budget." *) I was doing a bunch of awfulness with SQL-over-CSV files, but I really needed a database. I didn't want to go through the hassle of installing one, even though, on Debian, it's just apt-get install postgresql-client postgresql-server. Then I'd have to create...
on Aug 3, 2003