Skip to main content

Comments, Questions, Complaints?

Posted by daniel on September 27, 2004 at 7:50 AM PDT

Join the chat tomorrow with java.net on Java Live

The city is working on the water main for our street. We have a
small red hose running water to our house from a 4 inch temporary pipe
that runs down the street for the length of the block. At the end of
the block it branches to a two inch pipe that crosses the street and
runs up the other side of the street. You can see a red hose branch of
the pipe in front of every house and connects to where their garden hose ordinarilly lives.

Usually, we don't see the water main, nor the pipe that runs to our house. The water comes in and is metered and so we think of our water use in isolation. With the pipes running above the street we can see how water is a shared resource. That changes the perspective.

Some time today, java.net is going to be running blogs with the
pipes exposed above the ground. We're moving to Movable Type - I'll
say more about this tomorrow. But the big point is that we've always
believed in making changes in full view of you so that you can point
out how we can improve the site. Every once in a while the site feels
a bit rough - a bit under construction - to remind us that every web
site is a work in progress.

You can always submit feedback here on the site, but tomorrow you have a special opportunity as java.net is featured on Java Live. The Sun members of the java.net infrastructure team, John Bobowicz (JBob) and Chris Cheline, have been selected to talk about java.net and answer your questions. Join the chat September 28. 11:00 A.M. PDT/6:00 P.M. UTC.


Brett McLaughlin starts off the week by striking up some
controversy. This time his target is Open Source. In today's href="http://weblogs.java.net/">Weblogs, Brett provokes
you with Open Source
- A Divider?
saying " I'm actually a little tired of the
Java-open source dynamic. Here's another discussion that's raging
along, with relatively little interaction between the really smart
people on both sides. Instead, we seem to have lots of little
skirmishes between worker bees, when nobody is looking."

What is the right tool? The answer is, of course, href="http://weblogs.java.net/pub/wlg/1892">It depends. Malcolm
Davis blogs " The experienced engineer seems indecisive. Whenever
asked a question, the engineer simply replays with 'it
depends'. What is the web site developer trying to accomplish? If
it's a static content site, maybe Cocoon is the answer. Is it's a
portal site, maybe Jetspeed. Perhaps Struts if the site requires
dynamic web forms. Does the customer allow open source? Has the
customer already invested in a specific technology? Who are the
other developers on the team? What is the time frame of the
project?"

The t-shirt flinging contest is on again for this year's JavaOne. The plans are already underway and James Gosling invites you to Design your t-shirt launcher now! He advises you to " get thinking, get creative, and most important: get wierd."


In
Also in Java Today
, in href="http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2004/09/22/sitemesh.html">Advanced
SiteMesh, Sunil Patil digs into this open source technology,
which uses servlet filters to provide a consistent look and feel
to web sites, even those where the content is generated by
different underlying technologies. He writes "the easiest
possible solution is to let each of your web applications create
plain HTML content without knowing about how it is being
decorated, and only then have something else choose and apply
appropriate decorators. This is precisely what SiteMesh does."

Wes Munsil takes you through an example to show you the
potential problems with href="http://www.jot.fm/issues/issue_2004_09/column1">Converting
to Java 1.5 Type-Safe Collections. He says that the result is
more efficient and easier to understand but the process can take
quite a while. He suggests that you have good regression tests in
place, remove "unchecked" warnings that you find with
-Xlint:unchecked and introduce parametrized types. You will also
replace raw types, the use of Iterator, and (when possible)
instanceof.


In Projects and
Communities
, href="http://weblogs.java.net/pub/wlg/1888">MyJXTA 2.3.1a has
"recently incorporated some of the JDNC components to uplevel the
"rich content" editor component. This element of code is targeted
for a future release of BlogEd as well. "

The JELC
hosted Giant
Picture Dictionary
project is building a web site or desktop
application where you can type virtually any word to instantly
retrieve strikingly descriptive pictures and symbols for that
word.


"What will happen when href="http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=686&tstart=0#686">
the ONLY software left is that community maintained code?"
asks J Wenting in today's

Forums
. "At that point there will be no more community
because all developers will have changed jobs in order to make a
living, jobs that will require the same amount of dedication
software development does leaving them no time to maintain all
that software."

Simon Phipps responds, "You're making a common, huge mistake
here. href="http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=706&tstart=0#706">Who
is the community? You assume it's all people who have a 'day job'
who are writing the code in their spare time (away from their jobs
in McDonalds). It's not! It's people like the ones Sun employs,
experts at Apache, Gnome, NetBeans, OpenOffice.org and so on, who
are working on the projects. That is their day job."

Jonathan Simon continues the discussion of "Hackers and
Painters" chapter href="http://forums.java.net/jive/thread.jspa?messageID=702&tstart=0#702">Taste
for Makers. "I have met few developers that aren't really
picky about how their code is formatted. And I have seen more than
one team get very agitated over disagreement with others code
styles. (code braces, carriage returns, spacing ...)"


In today's java.net
News Headlines
:

Registered users can submit news items for the href="http://today.java.net/today/news/">java.net News Page
using our news
submission form
. All submissions go through an editorial
review before being posted to the site. You can also subscribe to
the href="http://today.java.net/pub/q/news_rss?x-ver=1.0">java.net
News RSS feed.


Current and upcoming
Java Events
:

  • September 28, 2004 href="http://java.sun.com/developer/community/chat/">java.net chat on Java Live
  • September 29-October 1, 2004 href="http://oscom.org/events/oscom4">OSCOM

Registered users can submit event listings for the href="http://www.java.net/events">java.net Events Page using our href="http://today.java.net/cs/user/create/e"> events submission
form. All submissions go through an editorial review before being
posted to the site.


Archives and Subscriptions: This blog is delivered
weekdays as the
Java
Today RSS feed
. Also, once this page is no longer featured as the
front page of java.net it will be
archived along with other past issues in the href="http://today.java.net/today/archive/">java.net Archive.