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Playing the home version of Jeopardy

Posted by daniel on January 21, 2005 at 6:21 AM PST

The answer is (binary) XML

John Mitchell has started a conversation about Binary XML He begins by asking "If binary XML is the answer, what exactly is the question?"

Also in today's Weblogs
Andreas Schaefar writes " I am always surprised when someone tells me
that he/she does not know href="http://weblogs.java.net/blog/schaefa/archive/2005/01/how_to_do_condi_1.html">how
to implement conditional compilation in Java. Here I want to
describe a way to implement it. I did not invent this but took the
idea from JBoss but I refined it here to accomplish some additional
feature like still have regular Java code. "

Jayson Falkner is way nicer than need be to a reader who writes href="http://weblogs.java.net/blog/jfalkner/archive/2005/01/blarg_11_help_m_1.html">
Help me print your book. I downloaded it for free. He does point
out "Printing 700+ pages requires a lot of paper, time, and ink. All
of those cost money. For $30 you can buy a pre-printed copy of the
whole book. Plus I get something like 15% on each sale. That is $4.50,
which happens to be enough money to buy a wet burrito, on wet burrito
day, at my favorite wet burrito joint. If you buy the book, I'll buy a
wet burrito, and that way we all win. Plus, you'd be amazed at what
some good food does to e-mail response times."


In Also
in Java Today
, Michael Feathers has written a story in which
the new guy explores ideas around href="http://www.butunclebob.com/ArticleS.MichaelFeathers.TheNewGuy">Using
Null Objects. The story centers around someone working with
legacy code who is introducing tests to the existing test free working
code. One programmer considers the introduction of null objects and
concludes that he thinks " it is a good idea but we have to make sure
people don't do it in production code."

Tell me if this has ever happened to you. You're developing part of a
large enterprise system and a key piece you interface with isn't done
by the time you need to unit test. Or not even started. Or it's
done, but it requires so many resources (servers, databases, licenses
for some third-party piece you've tied into), that setting up and
running a second copy for your testing is prohibitively expensive.
Often, the way out of this trap is to use mock objects to simulate the
other piece, and rather than write it yourself, you might want to have
the mock object created for you. EasyMock can do it, but its use of
java.lang.reflect.Proxy means you can only generate mock objects from
interfaces. In href="http://www.onjava.com/pub/a/onjava/2005/01/12/mocquer.html
">Mock Objects in Unit Tests, Lu Jian introduces his Mocquer
library, which generates mock objects not only from interfaces, but
from classes as well.


In Projects and
Communities
, the Jini
Community
has updated the href="http://www.jini.org/standards/">Jini Standards in response
to the href="http://www.jini.org/standards/Proposals/Gargoyles/proposal.html">Gargoyles
Proposals, which addressed three security issues in proxy trust
verification, class loading, and JERI distributed garbage collection.

The href="http://wiki.java.net/bin/view/Javapedia/WebHome">Javapedia
page on href="http://wiki.java.net/bin/view/Javapedia/Certification">certification
combines a list of the various Java certifications offered by Sun, a
collection of exam-preparation books, and a running discussion of the
merits of the certification program vis-a-vis others in the
industry.


DKKopp suggest focusing on a JavaOne party in today's href="http://forums.java.net/jive/index.jspa">
Forums. "This has nothing to do with content, but I think it is important nonetheless.

JavaOne needs to get back to having a good conference party! The last
couple of years have been pretty lean in that regard."

MarkF writes "I think Java needs a curses library, so that we can do serious console work. All the third-party curses libraries are either really crummy, or are completely dead projects."


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The answer is (binary) XML