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Should I Stay Or Should I Go?

Posted by editor on April 25, 2006 at 8:16 AM PDT


Note the lack of drama

Daniel IM'ed me last night while I was trying to write a podcast to ask if I was planning on doing something special with the site given the big news of turnover atop Sun's management.

My instant response: we're not a Sun site.

Sure, it's a big deal to everyone at Sun, which supports the site and has put many of their prominent projects here (the JDK itself, GlassFish, Project Looking Glass, etc.). But how much does does yesterday's news affect the membership, communities, or all the various projects? My counter-argument was to consider the other java.net partners: if Tim O'Reilly of O'Reilly Media, or Brian Behlendorf of Collabnet decided to step down or retire, would it affect the membership here enough to have a "stop the presses" moment?

What we've tried to do at java.net is to help create a community that exists as a valuable gathering unto itself, in its own right. So while Scott McNealy stepping aside and Jonathan Schwartz taking over as CEO is big news in terms of business, I think it has more the tenor of "interesting things going on outside of java.net". So, I linked to a News.com write up in the "Also in Java Today" section. News director Steve Mallett also picked it up for the "News" section.

We're here for the java.net community. We think it's a viable community that succeeds on its own terms and exists for its own sake, not simply as an appendage of some other entity.

All that said... I owe Daniel five bucks. I thought for sure that Hani would weigh in with some abuse before midnight our time.


Today's Feature Article, introduces the basics of

Writing Cool Games for Cellular Devices.
Games represent many of the most popular applications for Java ME, but how do you get started writing games for the small device? In this introduction, Kobi Krasnoff develops a simple, multi-screen basketball game for the mobile phone to show you how it's done.


Ben Galbraith makes the case for A Desktop Application Developer's Conference in today's Weblogs. "Too many of us really don't understand good UI design principles. Often, we haven't taken the time to check out what our (WinForms, Cocoa, SWT, etc.) neighbors are up to. And, of course, we all have more to learn about how to use our toolkit of choice more effectively. Do you think it would be a good idea to hold a 1-2 day Desktop Application Development conference?"

In Java Precisely, Masood Mortazavi writes about an interesting new book: "What makes Java Precisely valuable is not only its rigor and density but also the presentation style where textual explanation on the left has been complemented with code on the right no matter where you open the book."

Chris Campbell offers
Five Easy Pieces,
"a few short tidbits on some recent/nifty Mustang putbacks, documented here before my brain washes away on vacation."


In Also in
Java Today
,

News.com covers the change in Sun's management in McNealy steps down at Sun. "Sun Microsystems co-founder Scott McNealy has stepped down as chief executive, and has been replaced by President Jonathan Schwartz, the company said Monday. McNealy who will stay on as chairman, was one of four co-founders of Sun 24 years ago and has been CEO for the last 22 of those. Since then, he has been a strong and often contrarian voice for change in the computing industry."

Bill Venners considers Guido van Rossum's discussion of the rightness and wrongness of changes that break backward-compatbility, in Compatibility versus Entropy in Java and Python. "Many methods in the Java API have been deprecated, but I know of none that have been actually removed. The result is that Java over time has become more and more bloated with historical design artifacts, while Python remains more lean, mean, and clean. What do you think is the correct tradeoff between backwards compatibility and entropy reduction for Python and Java? Does Python go too far to clean things up from release to release? Does Java not go far enough?"


In today's Forums,
Don Casteel says he
need[s] a working BufferedRandomAccessFile class:
"I desperately need a working BufferedRandomAccessFile class, or something better for working with huge amounts of active data. (8Gb+). I've searched the net, and tried what I've found, but I can't seem to find a version that works. Many of the ones available on the net require additional package imports, or have depreciated methods."

kingwell has a
problem with encoding in facelets:
"Hi all, i have a problem about facelets encoding. I use mysql(default charset is utf-8) and facelets. It seems that every time i insert some records into the mysql via facelets based jsf program, the output will not displayed correctly until i add an additional escape="false" attribute. Without this attribute, the page will display the utf code directly, like "丫" etc., anyone has some idea of solving this problem?"

manyce400 considers an atypical career move:
J2EE to Swing: "Hi am a J2EE developer very interested in learning and working with Swing. Any advice on where i should begin. I find the swing presentation layer a bit confusing."


In Projects and
Communities
,

GELC executive director Bobbi Kurshan's blog GELC Progress - Moving Fast assesses the issues unique to the Global Education and Learning Community: "I have been spending the past 6 weeks meeting partners for GELC. And I have found that the issues to growing community and increasing projects circle around three topics..."

The xmlportlet project has graduated from the Portlet Community incubator. The project's mission "is to provide a base portlet to serve as a simple mechanism for transforming XML data into the view for your portlet application. This base portlet will be JSR-168 compliant and will relieve you from developing the basic boilerplate logic needed to transform XML using XSLT into HTML."


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Note the lack of drama