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Javaone: w/images Java SE and Java EE keynote pt2

Posted by calvinaustin on May 16, 2006 at 3:26 PM PDT

Java EE 5 for many of you is a big step forward to unifying the Java EE platform. The removal of application specific deployment scriptors should be very welcome, something that has always been a barrier between moving between applications. Learning deployment in Geronimo for example is just one extra tasks developers don't want to learn. There was the obligatory Netbeans demo, although the demos also featured a text editor and command line deployment. As Ludo and Bill study below...

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Bill quoted some numbers, that with all the Java EE 5 features the adventure builder demo is now 36% smaller (down from 67 classes to 43) but even more impressively a simple XML app was down from 5 files to 1.
He cited the Glassfish project had reached 300K downloads.

The next section was the new features in Java SE. Its interesting to me to see the number of Sun Java EE engineers now working on Java SE features. Java SE was never got the respect it deserved inside Sun (imho), Java ME and Java EE due to their associated revenue got more of the attention. New Java SE engineers include Danny Coward who will now be the Dolphin Spec lead (a fellow brit) and Roberto for XML/AJAX.

So one of the more non-incremental features planned is a transition plan for Visual Basic developers to the Java platform, a project called Semplice. This is well overdue, especially given the Java-Sun settlement all those years ago.
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Another feature was project Phobos, the ability to call Javascript to Java, following on from the petstore AJAX demo earlier in the day.

The rest of Java 7 may include native XML, friends, Swing application framework and Beans bindings, dyanamic language support. My first glance of native XML was that I didn't like it, it may be clever but including raw XML as per the slide make things more messy for me.

Finally if you don't like lines, Javaone still has teething issues with the new schedule tools. To get into the Java SE session took 10 minutes and then another 5-10 minutes to get out again!