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Project Tango at last week's .NET 3.5 plugfest

Posted by haroldcarr on July 18, 2007 at 1:51 PM PDT

Members of the

Project Tango (part of the Metro web services stack)

team

(Harold Carr,
Jiandong Guo,
Mike Grogan,
Ken Hofsass)

were at Microsoft's Redmond campus last week to participate in a


plugfest

to ensure web service interoperability between Java and .NET
3.0 and 3.5.

This is the fourth plugfest we've participated in. The

first three

were focused on interoperability between Java and .NET 3.0.
WSIT 1.0 passes all the scenarios for all all technologies when interoperating with .NET 3.0.

Microsoft has shipped Vista that includes .NET 3.0. We will FCS
WSIT 1.0 in September as part of

GlassFish v2.

The specifications that describe the interop between WSIT and .NET 3.0
are listed

here.

Note that most of the specifications in the above list are not
standard. Implementations of the standard versions of these
specifications will be included in .NET 3.5 and a post-FCS version of
WSIT.

We are just winding up our WSIT 1.0 FCS work and beginning our
work on the standard versions of the specs. We went to the plugfest
to ensure that web services and web service clients developed with
.NET 3.5 will interoperate with WSIT 1.0 clients and services. Here I
mean either a service developed with .NET 3.5 but choosing to use the
non-standard versions from .NET 3.0---or a .NET 3.5 client that can
communicate with a WSIT 1.0 service:

.NET 3.5 --> WSIT 1.0
WSIT 1.0 --> .NET 3.5

This is important since no one can control what platforms and tools
are used to build web service providers and consumers.

(Note: as noted above, we have already done extensive testing of
.NET 3.0 <--> WSIT 1.0 so feel confident with that
configuration.)

We did not have time to run all test scenarios, but, of those that
we did run, all passed except one (which is a test problem).
Specifically:

WS-Trust: scenarios: 1, 2, 5, 6 -- all passed.

WS-Trust: scenarios: 7, 9, 10 -- all passed
   in the following configurations:
    client      sts        service
WSIT 1.0    WSIT 1.0   .NET 3.5
.NET 3.5    .NET 3.5   WSIT 1.0

WS-SX: scenarios: 1, 4, 5, 6, 8 -- all passed
        .NET 3.5 <--> WSIT 1.0

WS-SC: scenarios: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 ,7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 -- all passed
        .NET 3.5 <--> WSIT 1.0

WS-Addressing:
        .NET 3.5 --> WSIT 1.0:

           Soap 1.1, Addressing 1.0 -- 24/24
           Soap 1.2, Addressing 1.0 -- 25/25
           Soap 1.1, Addressing 2004 -- 11/11
           Soap 1.2, Addressing 2004 -- 12/12

        WSIT 1.0 --> .NET 3.5:

           Soap 1.1, Addressing 1.0 -- 24/25 (we're investigating the failure)
           Soap 1.2, Addressing 1.0 -- 25/25
           Soap 1.1, Addressing 2004 -- 10/10
           Soap 1.2, Addressing 2004 -- 11/11

WS-ReliableMessaging:
        WSIT 1.0 <--> .NET 3.5 -- all passed:

           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.1 Request/Reply
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.1 Secure Request/Reply
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.1 OneWay
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.1 Secure OneWay
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.2 Request/Reply
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.2 Secure Request/Reply
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.2 OneWay
           RM1.0 Anonymous SOAP1.2 Secure OneWay

MTOM:

        WSIT 1.0 --> .NET 3.5:

           Soap 1.1 Utf8  No Security -- 5/5
           Soap 1.1 Utf16 No Security -- 4/5
           Soap 1.2 Utf8  No Security -- 5/5
           Soap 1.2 Utf8  No Security Aug2004 -- 5/5

The exact numbers and specifications above are not a concern of a
web service developer that uses WSIT. That's the whole point of
WSIT---to provide an easy to use platform that interoperates with .NET
3.x. It is not necessary to read nor understand the underlying
specifications nor to know the details of the above tests. That's
our job. The point of this blog entry is to let you know
were still working hard---about to release WSIT 1.0 and starting
the WSIT 1.1 implementation of the standard specifications.

Project tango is responsible for the WS-* implementations (e.g.,
reliability, transactions, security) in the GlassFish
Metro web services stack.

Here's a picture of the four of us in Redmond:



2007-07-18-pict0065_sm.jpg width=

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