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Fire Eagle updates from your Java phone

Posted by terrencebarr on August 26, 2008 at 7:42 AM PDT

fire-eagle.png With all the travel I'm doing lately I've been looking for a convenient way to keep people who are interested in getting in touch with me updated on my current whereabouts - I don't know about you but I prefer to get phone calls and IM messages during my waking hours rather than at 3 am local time ;-)

So lately I've started using Yahoo's Fire Eagle which allows me to broadcast my current location to a number of applications and web sites such as my IM client and my blog (this integration is coming soon). The question is: How does one update the position information frequently and conveniently while on the road? Using a mobile phone, of course ...

Fire Eagle Mobile Updater is a little Java ME app that automatically queries the phone's GPS via JSR-179 and then sends the location information to Fire Eagle for propagation. Fire Eagle Mobile Updater has been tested on the Nokia N95 but because it is Java ME it should run on most, if not all, JSR-179-enabled devices ... covering a big chunk of the GPS-enabled phone space. A great little example of how useful a pervasive platform such as Java ME can be.

Cheers,

-- Terrence

Comments

I've been working on a Java client library for Fire Eagle. The project is called jfireeagle: http://code.google.com/p/jfireeagle I've built a proof-of-concept Android application as well. The Android code is in jfireeagle's SVN repository: http://code.google.com/p/jfireeagle/source/browse/#svn/trunk

Grrr... thanks a lot for reminding me of my iPhones greatest deficiency: no Java. Even a cross-compiler would've been cool. I don't really care if there's a VM on it or not, but I do care that I can't run applications that are written in the world's most popular programming language. I feel your pain with regard to the infamous 3 a.m. phone call. Who wants to wake from blissful dreams only to realize that they are not really the President, and the call has nothing to do with national security.