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Janice Heiss Interviews Adam Bien about JavaFX

Posted by editor on January 25, 2010 at 11:36 AM PST

Adam Bien is well-known for his Java EE expertise -- but, that doesn't mean he refrains from exploring technologies that are emerging in other tiers within the Java world. This is proven by his just-published interview with SDN technology writer Janice Heiss, "Java Champion Adam Bien on JavaFX". We're featuring the interview as this week's java.net Spotlight.

Janice starts the interview by asking Adam if he agrees with Josh Marinacci's statements about the most important features of JavaFX:

Josh Marinacci lists the five most important features of JavaFX 1.2 as: Linux and Solaris support; UI controls and layout; easy-to-use chart types; new support in JavaFX common profile in the form of better persistence, RSS and Atom data feeds, and easier task implementation; and finally, better speed regarding memory usage, startup time and graphics performance. Do you agree? How do these improvements enhance possible uses of JavaFX?

Adam's response:

Good UI controls and layout are the key to success. JavaFX was very strong from the beginning in effects and graphics. It was, however, initially lacking in good, "skinnable" components, but this was fixed with version 1.2. JavaFX requires writing less code while it integrates very well with existing business logic written in Java. A reason to go the JavaFX route is better maintainability, and faster development with less code.

I found this description from Adam on memory domain within which JavaFX runs interesting:

JavaFX runs on top of a JVM and shares the address space with ordinary Java objects. POJOs can be directly accessed "per reference". You could, for example, implement in Java, JPA 2.0 and Derby DB the access to local persistence. The JPA entities can be easily accessed and manipulated by the JavaFX UI. There is no latency penalty in such a configuration -- the JavaFX UI has in-memory access to rich domain objects. Validation messages and state change are immediately visible in the UI. JavaFX eliminates lines and lines of boilerplate code, which, in turn, makes complex applications easier to maintain.

The interview continues with coverage of:

  • JavaFX scene graphs
  • opportunities for applying JavaFX in desktop, browser, and mobile applications
  • the JavaFX Production Suite Authoring Tool
  • Superfluous GoF patterns (with code examples)

It's always interesting hearing Adam Bien's insights on what's happening in the world of Java and technology in general. I didn't expect, though, to find him thoroughly investigating JavaFX. If you're interested in Adam's views on JavaFX, see the complete interview over on the SDN site.


In Java Today, James Gosling decides OK, it's time to look forward...

Enough of being maudlin, it's time to look forward to being a unified company: Sun + Oracle = Snorcle?

Kirill Grouchnikov talks about Custom component states in Substance 6.0:

Today i’m going to talk about the last big change that went into the next release of Substance look-and-feel – enhanced support for component states. What is a component state? Let’s take a look at buttons – the most basic building blocks on any UI toolkit. Buttons usually have icons and texts so that the users know what will happen when they click them. In addition, modern UI toolkits provide rich texturing capabilities that allow skinning different parts of the button visuals – such as background, border and focus ring...

Oracle has announced an Oracle + Sun Strategy Update Webcast this Wednesday, from 9 AM to 2 PM U.S. Pacific Time:

Find out how Oracle + Sun goes beyond your expectations to:

  • Offer a broad range of products including servers, storage, networking, and software
  • Integrate all the components–hardware, operating system, database, middleware, and applications–for unmatched performance, reliability, and security
  • Simplify IT management and reduce system deployment and integration costs
  • Continue to drive innovation in SPARC, Solaris, the Java platform, and many other technologies

In today's Weblogs, Erik van der velden announces [CAFE] UserProcedures integrated in trunk:

Last week we have merged the userprocedures branch into the trunk of sailfin-cafe. This blog will give a bit of background on what the userprocedures are, how they work in generally and what you can expect in the future. There will be some separate blogs highlighting the different procuedures individually...

Thomas Landgraf talks about Panta Rhei - A small piece of furniture revolutionising Pair Programming:

Everyone is talking about team work - but what exactly does it entail? Strictly speaking, the word denotes classical work division in which every team member is responsible for a clearly defined section of the entire production process. We at Micromata have a different view on team work: we want every team member to understand and be interested in their colleagues' areas of responsibility, too. Thus acting upon the maxim: "Shared knowledge has got twice the effect." ...

Ed Burns provides An Analysis of Peter Thomas's JSF Critical Rant:

There’s this guy, Peter Thomas, and he has this blog entry called “jsf sucks”. I don’t want to increase his page rank so I’m not linking to it here. However, it’s certainly a popular page since it’s the top link for “jsf sucks” on google, bing, and Yahoo!. I have read the entire blog entry, all of the entries linked from it, most of the comments on those entries, and some of the entries linked from those entries...


In the Forums, davjoh posted a question in the JXTA forum regarding Inputpipe events: Hi everyone, I know that the PipeMsgEvent fires once a message is received. Is there any way to detect events like when a peer as _started_ receiving a message? ...

amokrane wants to know How to write text on a texture using java3D API: Hello, I'm wondering how I can write some text on a given texture (during execution) ? I'm using the java3d API...

dmalis asks Which is better: 1 large noneditable textarea OR 10 smaller ones?: Hey guys, I'm working on news reader and wondering which approach is less memory/CPU intensive - to have 10 small noneditable textareas or to have 1 large in size of 10 smaller? ...


Our current Spotlight is Janice Heiss's interview with Java Champion Adam Bien on JavaFX. Adam's opening statement: "Good UI controls and layout are the key to success. JavaFX was very strong from the beginning in effects and graphics. It was, however, initially lacking in good, "skinnable" components, but this was fixed with version 1.2. JavaFX requires writing less code while it integrates very well with existing business logic written in Java. A reason to go the JavaFX route is better maintainability, and faster development with less code..."


This week's java.net Poll asks What's the most important java.net project going forward?. Voting will be close on Friday.


We've just published a new java.net Feature Article, Maven Repository Managers for the Enterprise, by John Smart. We're also featuring Jeff Friesen's Reading Newsfeeds in JavaFX with FeedRead, in which Jeff demonstrates how to apply JavaFX's RSS and Atom newsfeed capabilities to create a snazzy little JavaFX app that can run stand-alone or in a browser.


The latest Java Mobility Podcast is Java Mobile Podcast 92: MIDP 3.0 in Depth: Tutorials and Demonstrations: Excerpts from the JavaOne 2009 MIDP 3.0 In Depth: Tutorials and Demonstrations session with Roger Riggs, Lakshmi Dontamsetti and Stan Kao.


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