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java.net: the Week in Review - May 15, 2010

Posted by editor on May 15, 2010 at 12:01 PM PDT

JUG meetings, JavaOne, Java tools, JavaEE, and Glassfish shared the spotlight on java.net in the past week. If you didn't get a chance to visit java.net on a daily basis in the past week, read on, and you'll find all of the week's Java Today news items, a selection of java.net blog posts, and the old and new java.net spotlights and polls.

This week's index:


Tools, IDEs, etc.

The Hudson Mobi team announced Hudson CI Ver. 2.0 for Android is coming soon!

After the recent news on the US marketplace, I decided to start the support for Android OS 2.1 on the popular Hudson Mobi CI client for iPhone. HTC is becoming very popular with its new Nexus One (aka Google Phone), Legend and Desire models. How many of you are using Android vs iPhone ? The Android OS seems to be much more flexible in terms of Application development, so you shouldn’t wait too much for the first Hudson Mobi on the HTC...

The Java Tools Community has published JavaTools Community Newsletter - Issue 213:

A new edition of the newsletter is available, with news, new projects and tips! If you want to receive the newsletter by email, please subscribe the announcements mailing list - or read the current issue here.

The Java Tools Community announced: Updated NetBeans Samples Catalog Now Available!

The NetBeans Documentation team is pleased to announce the availability of the updated Samples Catalog on netbeans.org. In this catalog, you can find a variety of sample applications packaged as NetBeans IDE projects that are used throughout the NetBeans IDE tutorials. Browse the list of our sample projects for download on the Samples Catalog home page. Here you can find applications that cover various technologies supported in the IDE, from Java to C/C++ Share what you think about our samples: Write to netbeans-samples-feedback@samples.netbeans.org Join the Samples Catalog project and contribute your sample application to the community! We will be more than glad to collaborate with you and advertise your sample application and any other materials you submit on www.netbeans.org! If you have any questions about the NetBeans IDE Samples Catalog, contact us at netbeans-samples-feedback@samples.netbeans.org. The NetBeans Documentation team...

Geertjan Wielenga wrote about Griffon and NetBeans IDE 6.9 Beta (Part 2):

In part 1, I announced that you can now install Griffon support into NetBeans IDE 6.9 Beta. Yes, the same support used in some of the sessions at JavaOne last year, updated with new features since then, and now a pretty stable set of features for Griffon developers. However, some problems were identified by some of the nice people who tried it out in 6.9 Beta. Thanks to Steven C. Buttgereit, Vivek Deveshwar, and Piotr Zalewski, who reported the issues, I can now report that those (particular) issues are fixed! ...

John Ferguson Smart announced A new Java Power Tools Newsletter is available: the Art of Writing Maintainable Selenium Scripts:

Selenium is a popular web testing framework, that works well for both regression tests and acceptance tests. It works well almost all web applications, even those using complex AJAX-based user interfaces. However, writing maintainable Selenium scripts is harder than it looks, and in the real world these test scripts often fall into disuse as they become less and less maintainable. In this issue...

Marc Hadley announced the release of a Bumper Crop of WADL Tools:

Last week saw the release of WADL tools for Ruby, Python and C#...


JavaEE, GlassFish

Adam Bien asked How Popular Is Actually Java EE 6?

I'm back from the JAX 2010 - one of the biggest european Java conferences. There was lot more interests in Java EE 6, than expected: * The "Simpler? - Is Impossible - Java EE 6" Workshop was fully booked - with 75 reservations. The actual number of attendees was approx. 100-150. Even the repetition at the very last day was well attended (12-20 attendees I had far more attendees at the end, than at the beginning :-)). * The "60 Minutes With Java EE 6" talk was also well attended...

Alexis Moussine-Pouchkine wrote about EJB 3.1 asynchrony and transactions:

When presenting Java EE 6 and GlassFish v3 at the Lausanne JUG last week I was bombarded with questions (I like that) and I think I didn't do an ideal job answering the following question (paraphrasing):
How does the new async feature in EJB 3.1 work wrt transactions? The precise answer is easy to find in the EJB 3.1 specification itself (paragraph 4.5.3)...

Paul Sandoz announced that Jersey 1.2 is released:

We have just released version 1.2 of Jersey, the open source,
production quality, reference implementation of JAX-RS. The JAX-RS 1.1 specification is available at the JCP web site and also available in non-normative
HTML here. For an overview of JAX-RS features read the Jersey user
guide
. To get started with Jersey read the getting
started section
of that guide. To understand more about what Jersey
depends on read...

In the Aquarium, Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart announced SailFin CAFE b29 Now Available - Simplifying Converged Applications:

Binod announced the promotion of b29 of SailFin CAFE the server-side Java framework on top of JSR 289 (SIP Servlet 1.1) for developing SIP or Converged applications.
SailFin CAFE was
launched last June
and
runs on SailFin and on Oracles CCAS. Key contributors to the team include Oracle and Ericsson's employees...

Arun Gupta published TOTD #134: Interceptors 1.1 in Java EE 6 - What and How ?

TOTD #129 explained Managed Beans 1.0, this Tip Of The Day (TOTD) attempts to explain the basics of Interceptors 1.1 - a "new" specification introduced in the Java EE 6. The specification is not entirely new as the concept is borrowed from the EJB 3.0 specification and abstracted at a higher level so that it can be more generically applied to a broader set of specifications in the platform. Interceptors do what they say - they intercept on invocations and lifecycle events on an associated target class. Basically, interceptor...

On Developerworks, Andrew Glover published a new article, Java development 2.0: NoSQL:

NoSQL datastores like Bigtable and CouchDB are moving from margin to center in the Web 2.0 era because they solve the problem of scalability, and they solve it on a massive scale. Google and Facebook are just two of the big names that have bought in to NoSQL, and we're in early days yet. Schemaless datastores are fundamentally different from traditional relational databases, but leveraging them is easier than you might think, especially if you start with a domain model, rather than a relational one...

Jean-Francois Arcand talked about Writing Portable HTML5 WebSocket Application using the Atmosphere Framework:

The Atmosphere Framework now support the HTML5 WebSocket specification. If you don’t know what is WebSocket, I recommend you take a look at this introduction. As with Ajax Push/Comet, all major WebServer are starting supporting the specification, and guess what, all WebServer are doing it their own way. Sound familiar? Back in 2006, Jetty first introduced it’s Continuation API, closely followed by my Grizzly Comet Framework, and eventually we saw Tomcat AIO, Resin Comet and JBossWeb AIO native implementation. It took almost 4 years before Comet got standardized with the little-over-complicated Servlet 3.0 Async API. The exact same pattern is now happening, e.g. Jetty, Grizzly/GlassFish and Resin now support WebSocket, and again there is no portability across WebServer...

Masoud Kalili announced GlassFish Security Book Which Covers GlassFish v3 security, Java EE 6 security, and OpenSSO has just been published:

GlassFish security book authored by Masoud Kalali and published by Packt is now available for purchase. The book covers GlassFish, Java EE 6, OpenSSO and OpenDS...


Programming

Dustin Marx wrote Viral Bad Code: Why and What to Do About It:

In the Code Anthem blog post Bad Code is Viral, Amber Shah describes why "writing bad code is viral." This is a great post that reminds me of a pattern I have seen repeatedly: bad code does seem to have a viral nature. Even when the original bad code is rooted out, it is often removed too late and the infection has spread into other pieces of the code. In this post, I look at some of the observations I have made regarding bad viral code and how to contain it and eradicate it. Why Bad Code is So Viral ...

Tor Norbye provided Pixel Considerations:

Antialiasing makes lines and shapes look smooth - though sometimes at the expense of sharpness. What if you're trying to draw a horizontal or vertical line where you don't need antialiasing? You might be under the impression that if you position your shapes at round integer positions, you will avoid antialiasing. But it's not quite that simple - so avoid trying to be smart with layout code like this...


Platforms, Frameworks

Last week's new java.net poll asked: Will JavaFX ultimately become a widely used rich client technology? 368 votes were cast. The results were:

  • 1% (5 votes) - It's already widely used
  • 14% (50 votes) - The version 1.3 improvements make it more likely
  • 16% (59 votes) - Maybe
  • 40% (146 votes) - Probably not
  • 18% (67 votes) - No
  • 11% (41 votes) - I don't know

Jim Weaver wrote about EarthCubeFX on JavaFX-TV:

The previous blog post provided an example, named EarthCubeFX, of creating a 3D application with JavaFX 1.3. Today's post highlights Oracle JavaFX engineer and author Jim Clarke's experience running EarthCubeFX on JavaFX-TV. To quote Mr. Clark...

On her new blog, Amy Fowler posted JavaFX 1.3: Managed Gets Promoted:

Sometimes a node just doesn’t want its parent messing with its size or position. In 1.2 you could use LayoutInfo to mark a node as ‘unmanaged’ to tell its parent Container not to factor it into layout and this concept was limited to Container parents. With 1.3′s universal auto-sizing, suddenly all parents (Group, Container, CustomNode) care about managing their children, so we’ve moved the variable from LayoutInfoBase up to Node...


JVM/JDK

Last week's java.net Spotlight was Joseph Darcy's announcement, Draft of Restarted "OpenJDK Developers' Guide" available for discussion:

I've been working on a restarted version of the "OpenJDK Developers' Guide" and I have a draft far enough along for general discussion. The content of the existing guide is primarily logistical and procedural in nature; in time, I plan to migrate this information to a JDK 7 specific page because many of the details are release-specific. The new guide is more conceptual and once completed is intended to be able to last for several releases without major updating. The table of contents of draft version 0.775 is...

Roman Kennke investigated Subtleties in Java text rendering:

Lately Mario and I have been looking a little at a rendering bug in OpenJDK. The above is with OpenJDK on Linux, below is the same with closed JDK. As can be seen, in the above picture the undershoot of the ‘g’ is cut off. Mario did a lot of research and debugging in the low level Freetype font code. There are a lot of little things to consider, and for quite a long time it seemed that this bug has something to do with the Freetype font scaler. Let’s have a look at how the bounds appear for the ‘g’ glyph...


Mobile, JavaME

Ofir Leitner wrote about LWUIT in Mobile Web in JavaME apps - now with CSS!:

Following my post on Mobile Web in JavaME that discussed the new possibility of embedding web content inside LWUIT applications using HTMLComponent, I'm glad to announce that CSS support was added to HTMLComponent and is now publicly available in the LWUIT SVN. Now, developers can not only render HTML documents in their JavaME apps, but can also design them with CSS by adding colors, borders, backgrounds, fonts and more. This means that now HTMLComponent is almost fully compliant with the XHTML Mobile Profile 1.0 standard...

Fabrizio Giudici blogged about My first intensive user experience with Android (with a few developer hints...):

I'm just back from a six-days tour in Bourgogne, where I celebrated (with some delay) my fortieth birthday. The week was exclusively dedicated to photography (landscapes, romanesque and gothic churches, castles), food and wine and - occasionally - birding. No Java, no programming, no computer at all (with just a few exceptions). For all of my tourist needs I've exclusively used my Motorola...


Conferences, JUG Meetings

I posted an announcement, Bay Area JUG Roundup 2010 Features Networking, Information, and Big Prizes:

Van Riper contacted me about this Wednesday's Bay Area JUG Roundup 2010. The roundup will take place at the Oracle Conference Center in Redwood City, CA, from 6 to 9 PM, Pacific time. As I write this post, there are still 116 tickets available. The event is free for JUG members. However, registration is required. As Van points out in his post about the event, the "J" in JUG really stands for "JVM" today -- JUG meetings are for anyone who works with or is interested in languages that run on a JVM...

Eduardo Pelegri-Llopart reported seeing JavaOne Acceptances on Twitter and History on Google:

The acceptances for presentations at JavaOne have started to arrive, and the agenda for the conference can almost be constructed just from searching on twitter for #javaone... and it seems a good set of sessions. Google's new search tool for tweeter history clearly shows the spike the acceptance-driven spike...

Arun Gupta reported on the Bay Area JUG Roundup 2010 - Trip Report:

Oracle hosted the first Bay Area JUG Roundup yesterday. There were about 200 attendees from different JUGs and communities in the Bay Area. There were representatives from Silicon Valley Web JUG, San Francisco JUG, Silicon Valley JavaFX JUG, Oakland Java SIG, SDForum Java SIG, Bay Area Scala Enthusiasts, and SF Bay Groovy & Grails Group. Good quality free food, beer, wine, and tee-shirts left everybody thrilled. A live Java Posse session was certainly hilarious so stay tuned for their latest podcast....

Matt Raible provided notes from the recent Denver JUG meeting in What's New in Maven 3.0 with Matthew McCullough:

Last night, I attended the Denver JUG meeting to hear some excellent talks by Matthew McCullough and Tim Berglund. I took notes during Matthew's talk, but my battery ran out before Tim's talk started. Below are my notes. Matthew started out by described the differences between Maven 2 and Maven 3. As he began, he emphasized it wasn't a beginner talk, but mostly for existing Maven users that understand how to read a pom.xml and such...

John Ferguson Smart wrote about his Canberra JUG talk in "Real Developers Don't Need Unit Tests":

Recently I had the pleasure of giving a talk at the Canberra Java Users Groupon the topic 'Real Developers Don't Need Unit Tests': "Unit testing, and Test-Driven Development in particular, is a vital but neglected art. Proper TDD don't just test code: your tests are executable requirements that tell the story of your application, clarify your design, document your code and help track...

Jan Haderka announced his JavaOne updates:

Two talks at JavaOne this year: S313580 - "Swinglabs Dev Update" with Karl and Alex ... I hope guys will do most of the talking :D S314239 - "Building Content Management solutions based on Java Content Repository" together with Greg BTW for those wondering what is happening with the swinglabs.org, server have been recently moved around yet again. It is now...

This week's java.net Spotlight is Justin Kestelyn's coverage of the Bay Area JUG Roundup 2010 - A Good Time for All:

The first Bay Area JUG Roundup (#roundup10) convened at Oracle HQ on Wednesday evening, in the palatial surroundings of the Oracle Conference Center. (Yes, there will be more!) A couple hundred people were there, I'd say. More came out of this meetup than a bunch of new contacts and some mild indigestion (or even a mild hangover): - We (meaning, Oracle) announced the opening of the eight annual Duke's Choice Awards...

This week's java.net poll asks: What does the "J" in "JUGs" stand for?


Miscellaneous

Osvaldo Pinali Doederlein posted Flash Is a Right:

Ian Bogost's recent article Flash is Not a Right highlights some new aspects of the debate about Apple's iPhoneOS development restrictions. I have a different opinion...


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-- Kevin Farnham

O'Reilly Media
Twitter: @kevin_farnham