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Hudson on the Rise: CloudBees and Indeed Job Trends

Posted by editor on August 27, 2010 at 7:40 AM PDT

Two news items attest to the traction Hudson is gaining in the automated build market. Our latest java.net Spotlight is the Hudson Labs announcement CloudBees announce Hudson-as-a-Service. What's CloudBees? Here's the vision statement from their Welcome to CloudBees blog post:

At CloudBees we think that the cloud is the new platform, where applications will shift to over time. Yet, for this to happen en masse, true cloud-native infrastructure has to be available – this cannot be a mere packaging of existing products with a “cloud” stamp on it. As we shift towards this new paradigm, CloudBees aims at becoming the leading Platform as a Service (PaaS) for Java applications. And while CloudBees' platform will initially appeal to end-user companies, our platform is built with ISVs in mind: we envision that most ISVs will have to morph into a SaaS model if they want to outlive their SaaS competitors. Yet, given the complexity involved, very few ISVs will find it viable to develop their own multi-tenant architecture.Furthermore, CloudBees will not just focus on a production-time Java PaaS: we will deliver an offering that covers the complete applications' lifecycle, from dev to production, through staging and QA.

Kohsuke Kawaguchi, who announced the CloudBees news on the Hudson Labs blog, said:

I see this as yet another validation to Hudson, and as such, I welcome this new addition to the community and wish them well! — more companies betting on Hudson means we'll get more investment to the project, which is all goodness for Hudson users. ... Hosted Hudson offers an interesting trade-off, compared to on-premise Hudson. On the plus side, given the current hourly pricing of public clouds like EC2 and Rackspace, you get a better pricing model, as CloudBees charge by minutes. You also get rid of machines and upfront cost, which is great for small business. On top of that, you can also expect them to gradually develop more value-adds and better integration to various other pieces, which can get really interesting.

On Twitter, @kohsukekawa also pointed out the interesting graph below, from the job search site Indeed.job:

Hudson is clearly on the rise.


Java Today

Dustin Marx is following More JavaOne 2010 Blogs and Articles:

Several more interesting blogs and articles on JavaOne 2010 have been published recently.  In this blog post, I point to and summarize some of these. In Oracle Takes Over JavaOne Conference, Paul Krill discusses several themes, both advertised and unadvertised, that are likely to prevail at JavaOne.  He alludes to the recent announcement that Oracle CEO Larry Ellison would join Executive Vice President Thomas Kurian for the JavaOne 2010 opening keynote ("Java Strategy and Directions").  James Sugrue highlights this keynote in One Keynote You Won't Want to Miss and there are numerous interesting comments on that post's feedback.  Krill also references the later JavaOne keynote that boats Mark Reinhold as a contributor...

On developerWorks, Masahiko Maedera investigates Unicode surrogate programming with the Java language:

Since version 1.5, the Java™ language has provided APIs supporting Unicode supplementary characters that can't be represented by a single 16-bit char data type. This article discusses the features of these APIs, shows their correct usage, and evaluates their processing performance...

Neal Gafter presents A couple of comments on Defender Methods:

Brian Goetz has posted version 3 of his proposal "Defender Methods", which is a way of adding methods to existing interfaces without breaking binary compatibility. Generally speaking, I think the idea is sound but I think there are some problems with the proposal in its current form. I would normally post my comments on the proposal to the lambda-dev mailing list, which ensures that any IP embedded in my comments are formally submitted to Oracle's ownership. However, Oracle's recent lawsuit against Google has made it clear that, even though I am a contributor to openjdk7, I do not have a license to Oracle's patents that are necessarily infringed by the use of the openjdk7 source base. This is a very confusing position for the organizer of an open-source effort to take. Rather than continuing to contribute IP directly to the project, I'll post my comments here and contribute them to Oracle once it is clear that I've been granted a license to the patents necessary to use openjdk7...

The JavaOne Conference Blog invites us to Meet Duchess at JavaOne:

Regina Ten Bruggencate and several other Duchesses are joining JavaOne this year as Java User Group leaders, unconference presenters and TechCast interviewees. Regina is a 12 year Java developer veteran. She is a very versatile Java consultant and has worked for a range of industries such as financial institutions, retail, government and transportation and she is now working for a large international airport in the Netherlands...


Poll

The topic of the current java.net poll is the "JavaOne Strategy and Directions" Keynote, which will feature Larry Ellison and Thomas Kurian. Our poll asks: Which area will receive the most attention in the JavaOne "Java Strategy and Directions" keynote? The poll will be open until Monday.


Spotlights

Our new java.net Spotlight is the Hudson Labs news, CloudBees announce Hudson-as-a-Service:

CloudBees announced the beta availability of their new Hudson-as-a-service "HaaS" today. I see this as yet another validation to Hudson, and as such, I welcome this new addition to the community and wish them well! — more companies betting on Hudson means we'll get more investment to the project, which is all goodness for Hudson users...

We're also spotlighting Community Manager Sonya Barry's blog post Tell me what you think:

"For several years now I've been involved in on-again, off-again plans to do a major upgrade to the site. This time it's really happening. People are working on building out the new site now, and we're going to start rolling out the migration plan here once the first tests are complete. Our goal for migration...


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-- Kevin Farnham

Twitter: @kevin_farnham

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